Otter

Species Description

River otters are well suited to life in the water. They have streamlined bodies, webbed feet and long, tapered tails. Their ears and nose close when they go underwater. Dense, oily fur and heavy layers of body fat insulate them in the water. The have an acute sense of smell, and prominent facial whiskers, which are extremely sensitive to touch. Otters are dark brown with pale brown or gray bellies. The muzzle and throat are silvery. Males and females look alike, although males are larger. Otters are relatively long-lived. In captivity, some bred at 17 years and lived to 19 years of age. They are graceful, powerful swimmers and can remain submerged for 3 to 4 minutes. On land, they travel with a loping gate. On snow or ice, they alternate loping with sliding.

Biological Information
Title
Seasons
Otter

Otter in water

Season Closed
  • November 15, 2021 to February 20, 2022

Daily limit: Any number
Possession limit: Any number

Furbearers: Trapping: Allowed Methods

Methods

Traps must have smooth or rubber jaws only

Foot-hold trap

Conibear or other killing-type trap

Foot-enclosing trap

Cage-type trap

Colony traps with openings no greater than 6 inches in height and 6 inches wide

Cable restraint devices

Snares set underwater, have a loop 15 inches or less in diameter when set, have a stop device that prevents snare from closing to less than 2 1/2 inches in diameter, mad with cable that is between 5/64 inch and 1/8 inch in diameter, and have a mechanical lock and anchor swivel.

Additional Info

Within communities having 10,000 or more inhabitants, only cage-type or foot-enclosing traps, may be set within 150 feet of any residence or occupied building.

Furbearers: Trapping: Prohibited Methods

Methods

Dogs may not be used for aquatic furbearers (beaver, muskrat, mink, otter) 

Snares on land

Pitfalls

Deadfalls

Nets

Traps may not be set in paths made or used by people or domestic animals.

Killing-type traps may not be set along public roadways.

Additional Info