landowner with a pollinator garden.jpg

A landowner poses behind her wildflower garden.
Landowners can give pollinators a helping hand on their property. MDC and its partners will present a Native Wildflower and Pollinator workshop for landowners on June 18 from 6-8:30 p.m. in Warrenton.

MDC, USDA, and Quail Forever offer Native Wildflower and Pollinator workshop June 18 in Warrenton

News from the region

St. Louis
May 31, 2019

WARRENTON, Mo.—Pollinators are essential to producing the food we eat and the flowers we love. Yet they are increasingly threatened by loss of habitat. Landowners can make a positive difference for pollinators by creating good habitat on their property.

The Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) is joining with U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), and Quail Forever to present a Native Wildflower and Pollinator workshop for landowners on June 18 from 6-8:30 p.m. in Warrenton. The workshop is free and will take place on a cooperator’s private property at 28211 Sunnyside Road.

The presenters will be MDC Private Lands Consultant Lia Heppermann and Quail Forever Farm Bill Biologist Wesley Hanks. Heppermann and Hanks will cover why pollinators are so important, what constitutes good habitat for pollinators, and how quality pollinator habitat can benefit many other kinds of wildlife, too. Participants will also learn specific planting and management strategies they can apply to their property that will get the results they want.

The Native Wildflower and Pollinator workshop is limited to 30 people, and drinks and snacks will be provided. Preregistration is required by calling 573-301-9672, or email Wesley Hanks. Deadline for registration is June 14.

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