Field Guide

Butterflies and Moths

Showing 1 - 10 of 58 results
Media
image of a Black-Waved Flannel Moth resting on a leaf
Species Types
Scientific Name
Eleven species in North America north of Mexico
Description
The flannel moths are a small family, and only three species are usually found in Missouri. Adults are stout and very hairy and fluffy looking. Caterpillars have thick hair containing stinging spines.
Media
image of a Yellow-Fringed Dolichomia Moth
Species Types
Scientific Name
More than 680 species in North America north of Mexico
Description
The pyralids are a large and diverse family of mostly small or medium-sized moths. They often look like they have snouts.
Media
image of a Clouded Sulphur on a wildflower
Species Types
Scientific Name
Colias philodice
Description
The clouded sulphur is one of our most common butterflies, flying low over fields and lawns, from late March into December.
Media
image of a Rosy Maple Moth
Species Types
Scientific Name
Dryocampa rubicunda
Description
The rosy maple moth has a variable coloration. In most cases, it is white or cream-colored, with some amount of pink at the outer and inner portions of the wings.
Media
Bronze copper butterfly perched on a grass blade, wings closed
Species Types
Scientific Name
Lycaena hyllus (syn. Hyllolycaena hyllus; Lycaena thoe)
Description
The bronze copper occurs in localized colonies in throughout northern and western Missouri. Look for it May through October in wet, open, grassy areas.
Media
Tortricid moth resting on a leaf
Species Types
Scientific Name
About 1,400 species in North America north of Mexico
Description
At rest, tortricid moths often have a distinctive shape, resembling an arrowhead or a bell, with the forewing tips either squared-off or flared outward.
Media
image of Plume Moth on blade of grass
Species Types
Scientific Name
Nearly 150 species in North America north of Mexico
Description
Slim, delicate plume moths are instantly recognizable by their T-shaped silhouette, long legs, and muted shades of tan and brown. It can be hard to separate the various species.
Media
Photo of a gray copper butterfly nectaring on butterfly weed flowers
Species Types
Scientific Name
Lycaena dione (formerly Gaeides xanthoides dione)
Description
The gray copper is locally common in the western half of Missouri, where it flies in June and July. Look for it in moist, grassy, open areas during those months.
Media
Photo of a Summer Azure
Species Types
Scientific Name
Celastrina neglecta
Description
Formerly considered the same species as the spring azure, the summer azure can be identified, in large part, by the season when you see it.
Media
Photo of a little yellow nectaring on a native aster flower
Species Types
Scientific Name
Pyrisitia lisa (syn. Eurema lisa)
Description
The little yellow is just what the name says it is. The lower side is yellow with a few spots, including two tiny black spots on the basal hindwing and, often, a larger rusty spot on the hindwing margin.
See Also
Media
image of Caddisfly on leaf
Species Types
Scientific Name
About 1,500 species in North America north of Mexico
Description
Adult caddisflies are mothlike. Their larvae are aquatic and build portable, protective cases out of local materials, including grains of sand, bits of leaves and twigs, and other debris.
Media
Photo of eastern dobsonfly
Species Types
Scientific Name
Corydalus cornutus
Description
Adult eastern dobsonflies are huge and mothlike, with large wings and a weak, fluttery flight. The fiercely predaceous aquatic larvae, called hellgrammites, are well-known to anglers, who often use them as bait.

About Butterflies and Moths in Missouri

Butterflies, skippers, and moths belong to an insect order called the Lepidoptera — the "scale-winged" insects. These living jewels have tiny, overlapping scales that cover their wings like shingles. The scales, whether muted or colorful, seem dusty if they rub off on your fingers. Many butterflies and moths are associated with particular types of food plants, which their caterpillars must eat in order to survive.