Field Guide

Butterflies and Moths

Showing 1 - 10 of 53 results
Media
image of an Ailanthus Webworm Moth on a flower
Species Types
Scientific Name
Atteva aurea
Description
Ailanthus webworm moths visit flowers in the daytime but also come to lights at night. Larvae live communally in silken webs in tree-of-heaven, an invasive tree from Asia.
Media
Baltimore checkerspot, perched, with wings folded
Species Types
Scientific Name
Euphydryas phaeton
Description
The Baltimore checkerspot is unforgettable. In Missouri it is locally abundant in the eastern Ozarks, but rare elsewhere.
Media
Photo of a Banded Tiger Moth
Species Types
Scientific Name
Apantesis vittata
Description
The striking pattern on the banded tiger moth tells predators that these insects are inedible. But what serves as a “warning label” to birds is attractive to us!
Media
Photo of a Black Swallowtail, Male, Wings Spread
Species Types
Scientific Name
Papilio polyxenes
Description
Most gardeners meet the black swallowtail sooner or later, because parsley, carrot, fennel, and dill are favorite food plants of the caterpillars.
Media
Photo of a Black-and-Yellow Lichen Moth
Species Types
Scientific Name
Lycomorpha pholus
Description
The black-and-yellow lichen moth is aptly named. “Lichen” refers to the caterpillars’ food as well as to their camouflage.
Media
Several regal fritillaries feeding on butterfly weed
Species Types
Scientific Name
More than 700 species in North America north of Mexico
Description
Learn about butterflies and skippers as a group. What makes a butterfly a butterfly? How are they different from moths? What are the major groups of butterflies?
Media
Image of a Cecropia moth.
Species Types
Scientific Name
Hyalophora cecropia
Description
The cecropia moth looks a lot like butterfly ― but note its feathery antennae and stout, hairy body. This is the largest moth native to North America.
Media
Photo of a sod webworm adult moth on a window with hind end propped up
Species Types
Scientific Name
More than 860 species in North America north of Mexico
Description
Crambid snout moths are named for the mouthparts that project outward like a snout. They are very similar to the closely related family of pyralid moths.
Media
Photo of a Delaware Skipper
Species Types
Scientific Name
Anatrytone logan
Description
The undersides of the Delaware skipper's wings are solid orange. It's found statewide in a variety of habitats.
Media
Photo of an eastern comma butterfly, wings spread, showing dorsal side of wings
Species Types
Scientific Name
Polygonia comma
Description
The eastern comma is named for a small white mark on the underside of the hindwing. It flies spring through fall, and even in winter, on warm, sunny days.
See Also
Media
image of Caddisfly on leaf
Species Types
Scientific Name
About 1,500 species in North America north of Mexico
Description
Adult caddisflies are mothlike. Their larvae are aquatic and build portable, protective cases out of local materials, including grains of sand, bits of leaves and twigs, and other debris.
Media
Photo of eastern dobsonfly
Species Types
Scientific Name
Corydalus cornutus
Description
Adult eastern dobsonflies are huge and mothlike, with large wings and a weak, fluttery flight. The fiercely predaceous aquatic larvae, called hellgrammites, are well-known to anglers, who often use them as bait.

About Butterflies and Moths in Missouri

Butterflies, skippers, and moths belong to an insect order called the Lepidoptera — the "scale-winged" insects. These living jewels have tiny, overlapping scales that cover their wings like shingles. The scales, whether muted or colorful, seem dusty if they rub off on your fingers. Many butterflies and moths are associated with particular types of food plants, which their caterpillars must eat in order to survive.