Field Guide

Birds

Showing 1 - 10 of 23 results
Media
Photo of an American wigeon pair floating on water surface.
Species Types
Scientific Name
Anas americana
Description
A common migrant in Missouri, the American wigeon is a dabbling duck whose males have a white forehead and crown, a green band behind the eye and down the back of the neck, and a large white patch on the wing.
Media
Photo of a male blue-winged teal floating on water.
Species Types
Scientific Name
Anas discors
Description
Blue-winged teal are dabblers, often seen in shallows sifting water and mud for goodies, rarely diving but able to take flight by jumping directly from the water into the air. Males have a distinctive white crescent on their dark gray heads.
Media
Photo of a male bufflehead duck floating on water
Species Types
Scientific Name
Bucephala albeola
Description
Buffleheads are small, compact ducks with large, rounded heads. They bob lightly in the water, then, in a flash, dive below the surface.
Media
Photo of Canada goose swimming
Species Types
Scientific Name
Branta canadensis
Description
Canada geese are recognizable by their brownish bodies, black necks and heads, and a distinctive broad white patch that runs beneath their heads from ear to ear.
Media
Photo of a male canvasback floating on the water.
Species Types
Scientific Name
Aythya valisineria
Description
A diving duck or pochard, the canvasback forages on the bottom of lakes, rivers, and marshes for invertebrates and plants. It is a common migrant in Missouri.
Media
Photo of a male common goldeneye floating on the surface of the Mississippi River
Species Types
Scientific Name
Bucephala clangula
Description
The common goldeneye is a common migrant and winter resident in Missouri. A diving duck, it is usually found on open water of rivers and lakes.
Media
Photo of a male common merganser floating on water.
Species Types
Scientific Name
Mergus merganser
Description
Like our other mergansers, the common merganser has a long, slender, serrated bill and dives underwater for fish. This species, however, has only a short head crest and has unique color patterns.
Media
Photograph of two Double-Crested Cormorants perched on log above water
Species Types
Scientific Name
Phalacrocorax auritus
Description
Double-crested cormorants are dark, ducklike water birds with long necks, hooked bills, legs set far back on the body, and a habit of hanging their wings out to dry in the sun.
Media
Photo of a pair of greater scaup floating on water.
Species Types
Scientific Name
Aythyra marila
Description
The male greater scaup is a diving duck with a black head and chest, white sides, and black tail end. It's a rare migrant in Missouri. You can tell it from the similar lesser scaup by its rounded (not peaked) head.
Media
Photo of a white-fronted goose.
Species Types
Scientific Name
Anser albifrons
Description
More common in western North America, the greater white-fronted goose is likewise more common in western Missouri than in the east. They are grayish brown and have pink or orange bills.
See Also
Media
Photo of a Snowberry Clearwing
Species Types
Scientific Name
Hemaris diffinis
Description
The snowberry clearwing is a moth that confuses people because it looks like a bumblebee and flies like a hummingbird!
Media
White-Lined Sphinx Moth
Species Types
Scientific Name
Hyles lineata
Description
The white-lined sphinx moth sometimes confuses people because it flies, hovers, and eats from flowers like a hummingbird. The adults often fly during daylight hours as well as in the night and are often found at lights.
Media
Photo of a Virginia Creeper Sphinx moth
Species Types
Scientific Name
Darapsa myron
Description
The Virginia creeper sphinx moth is common in woods and brushy areas and comes to lights at night. The larvae eat Virginia creeper and grape leaves.
Media
Photo of a tricolored bat hanging from a cave ceiling.
Species Types
Scientific Name
Perimyotis subflavus (formerly Pipistrellus subflavus)
Description
Tri-colored bats, formerly called eastern pipistrelles, are relatively small and look pale yellowish or pale reddish brown. The main hairs are dark gray at the base, broadly banded with yellowish brown, and tipped with dark brown.
Media
Photo of four gray myotises clinging to a cave ceiling.
Species Types
Scientific Name
Myotis grisescens
Description
Gray myotises are difficult to distinguish from other mouse-eared bats. A key identifying feature of the gray myotis is that its wing is attached to the ankle and not at the base of the toes. It’s an endangered species.
Media
Photo of a little brown myotis hanging from cave wall with lesions on its wrist.
Species Types
Scientific Name
Myotis lucifugus
Description
The little brown myotis (little brown bat) is one of our most common bats, but populations are declining. White-nose syndrome has taken a heavy toll in northeastern states. This species is now listed as vulnerable across its range.
Media
Photo of an Indiana myotis hanging from a cave ceiling.
Species Types
Scientific Name
Myotis sodalis
Description
The Indiana myotis, or Indiana bat, summers along streams and rivers in north Missouri, raising its young under the bark of certain trees. It is an endangered species.

About Birds in Missouri

About 350 species of birds are likely to be seen in Missouri, though nearly 400 have been recorded within our borders. Most people know a bird when they see one — it has feathers, wings, and a bill. Birds are warm-blooded, and most species can fly. Many migrate hundreds or thousands of miles. Birds lay hard-shelled eggs (often in a nest), and the parents care for the young. Many communicate with songs and calls.