From the Missouri Conservationist Magazine
August 2014 Issue

Letters

Submissions reflect readers’ opinions and might be edited for length and clarity.

Citizens are Key

I read your article Missouri Citizens are Key to Deer Management Success in the June issue. The article confirms my suspicions about deer densities. I live in St. Louis County and see deer here all the time. I also own 20 acres in rural Warren County that I visit twice a week and have not seen a deer or deer tracks there in three years.

Jim Smith, via Internet

Mystery Turtle

As a long-time subscriber to the Missouri Conservationist, I always enjoy the identification of birds and animals found within our state. However, on Page 18 of the June issue, I could not find any identification of the turtle being held. Could you help me out?

Dreanna Vallina

Ombudsman’s Note: The turtle pictured is a common snapping turtle. Learn more about them at mdc.mo.gov/node/3177 —Tim E. Smith

A Frog and a Smile

I really enjoy your very fine magazine with all the informative articles. The photography is top notch, but the photo of the young boy with the bullfrog on Page 33 [Discover Nature] of the July issue is “Blue Ribbon.” The grin on that kid’s face tells it all. Oh, does that bring back memories!

Mike Moore, Warsaw

Cartoon Moon Flip

Regarding the July Chmielniak cartoon, the upward-facing crescent moon is not possible during the night as it is depicted in the illustration.

The sun would have to be above the moon, and it would thus be daytime. This is not an uncommon mistake for illustrators and graphic artists, but since this is a nature magazine I am calling you on the minor error. Having said that, I still enjoy the cartoon and the magazine and have for many years. Keep looking up!

Grant Miller, NASA/JPL Solar System Ambassador volunteer, AstronomyGuy on Twitter & Facebook, Warrensburg

Friendly Fliers

Nice article on emerald dragonflies in the magazine [Emeralds of the Ozarks; July]. I’ll add one more touch: We think they’re friendly! It’s nothing unusual to be sitting in the Current River or in a canoe and have one of those iridescent lovelies land on your knee or a cap bill and be satisfied to sit and watch you for as long as you’d like to sit and watch them. Always thinking of leaving nature unharmed when we are enjoying the outdoors, we’re content to let them be and see how long they will keep us company.

Mark Ridgway, via Facebook

Managed Hunt Info

I’m new to Missouri and trying to apply for a managed hunt. Is there a convenient way to determine all managed hunts that are in my area?

Clint Rhodes, via Facebook

Conservation Department: You can find a listing of managed hunts in our 2014 Fall Deer and Turkey Hunting Regulations and Information booklet, available on our Hunting/Trapping page at mdc.mo.gov/node/88 or anywhere that hunting and fishing permits are sold.

Pond Help

What do I do with a pond covered with algae?

Jim Kennedy, via Facebook

Conservation Department: Here’s a link to a document that provides advice on algae control: go.usa.gov/8GrH.

Correction

In the July issue of the Conservationist, in Conservation Commission Actions, the second bullet point from the bottom says, “Approved the advertisement and sale of estimated 939,003 million board feet of timber on 331 acres on Compartment 14 of Indian Trail CA in Dent County.” The word “million” should be have been deleted from that sentence.

Reader Photo

Orchids

Carol Messersmith captured this photo of crested coral root orchids on her property

in Rocky Mount, Missouri. “I noticed the orchid as I was taking a walk,” said Messersmith. “It was along our roadside, under a cedar tree. It was a mystery plant for weeks. We consulted a number of books and asked everyone we know what they thought, but it wasn’t until we sent the photo to [Morgan County] Conservation Agent Matt Smith that we learned its identity.” Messersmith said she has been an avid photographer for most of her life. “The majority of my photos are taken on and around our property,” she said, “but, of course, my camera is with me wherever I go.”

Also in this issue

Trotlines

Line Up for a Good Time

Limb lines, jug lines, trotlines, throwlines, and bank lines add variety and excitement to catfishing.

columbine plants

Flora and Folklore

With names that describe healing properties, point to common uses, or tell fanciful stories, Missouri wildflowers bloom with a rich heritage.

Pseudoscorpion

Tiny Hitchers

Pseudoscorpions get around in an unusual way.

And More...

This Issue's Staff:

Editor In Chief - Nichole LeClair Terrill
Managing Editor - vacant
Art Director - Cliff White
Staff Writer/Editor - Brett Dufur
Staff Writer - Jim Low
Photographer - Noppadol Paothong
Photographer - David Stonner
Designer - Stephanie Thurber
Circulation - Laura Scheuler