From the Missouri Conservationist Magazine
December 2010 Issue

places.jpg

daniel boone ca
David Stonner

Places To Go

Daniel Boone CA

Although many December visitors to Daniel Boone CA will be aiming for whitetails during the archery and muzzleloader portions of deer season, this 3,520-acre area is open to several other popular winter activities, including birding, hiking, camping and fishing.

Daniel Boone Conservation Area is in western Warren County, about seven miles southwest of Jonesburg, and within a one-hour drive of St. Louis. The area is named in memory of the great pioneer and woodsman. In 1943, former Conservation Commissioner A.P. Greensfelder, an ardent conservationist, donated the original acreage for this area to the Conservation Department. Later purchases brought the area (including the 923-acre Razor Hollow Natural Area) to its present size.

This area receives intensive restoration and management that promotes overall natural community health. As it was in Daniel Boone’s day, the area is rich in uncommon, habitat-specific plants, such as heart-leaved plantain and fragrant ladies’ tresses orchids, and woodland animals, including white-tailed deer, turkey, squirrel and ruffed grouse.

Birders can expect to find great opportunities for viewing grassland, shrub- and forest-dependent bird species, such as the pileated woodpecker.

A hike on the area’s seven-mile multi-use trail will lead through deep valleys, glades and rugged wooded hills. While the multi-use trail is open to hiking throughout the year, it is closed to mountain biking and horseback riding from the beginning of fall turkey season through the end of spring turkey season.

In the summer, natural history enthusiasts will enjoy opportunities to encounter such elusive woodland creatures as the wood frog and spotted salamander. In addition, seasonal small waterfalls will delight visitors when the weather has been rainy or snowy.

Camping is allowed on 10 designated areas and in the horse-staging area (12 sites grouped together). Aside from deer, hunters will find good populations of squirrel and turkey to pursue during season. Anglers can cast for bass and catfish in the area’s four fishing ponds, as well as pursue redear sunfish in lakes One and Two.

As always, check the area’s Web page for map, brochure, regulations and possible special notices before visiting.

—Bonnie Chasteen, photo by David Stonner


Recreation Opportunities: Birding, camping, fishing, hiking, biking and horseback riding in season, hunting and nature appreciation

Unique Features: This is a predominantly forested area with primitive camping, picnic area, four fishing ponds and a multi-use trail.

For More Information Call 636-441-4554, or visit www.MissouriConservation.org/a4603.

Also in this issue

elk

Missouri's History With the Elk

This majestic animal's bugle has been silent in Missouri for more than 100 years, but next year the Department plans to restore elk in a defined area.

trapping education

Trapping-Education Over Extinction

Sharing the secrets of success preserves an outdoor tradition.

quail country

Quail Country

Imperfect landscapes can be remodeled into great habitat.

This Issue's Staff:

Editor In Chief - Ara Clark
Managing Editor - Nichole LeClair Terrill
Art Director - Cliff White
Staff Writer - Bonnie Chasteen
Staff Writer - Jim Low
Photographer - Noppadol Paothong
Photographer - David Stonner
Designer - Stephanie Thurber
Artist - Dave Besenger
Artist - Mark Raithel
Circulation - Laura Scheuler