From the Missouri Conservationist Magazine
April 1996 Issue

Vantage Point

Reality Check

April, known for its practical jokes, is a good month for a reality check. Nature plays tricks now too, warming new buds one day and nipping them the next. But do a reality check: winter is losing its grip - spring is here!

Let the following Myths and Realities help with your reality check on Missouri conservation:

Myth: The Conservation Department is buying land faster than ever before. It now owns much of the state of Missouri.

Reality: The purchase of land by MDC has declined steadily since 1982. The Conservation Department owns about 1.6 percent of the state's total land mass. Ninety-three percent of the state is privately owned.

Myth: The Conservation Department deprives counties of tax revenue when it purchases land for public use.

Reality: Since 1980, the Conservation Department has paid more than $5 million in-lieu-of-tax payments to 111 Missouri counties. Counties with land enrolled in MDC's forest cropland program earned close to $400,000 in the last fiscal year.

Myth: Forest land in Missouri is shrinking.

Reality: Forest cover in Missouri has increased by over one million acres since 1972.

Myth: Most wildlife populations are now healthy and abundant in Missouri.

Reality: Turkey and deer populations are up dramatically from 1980, but quail and waterfowl numbers are down. Prairie chickens continue to decline, and the number of animals on the rare and endangered species lists has increased by 20 percent since 1984. Declining wildlife populations are due to shrinking habitat.

Myth: The Conservation Department's program called Coordinated Resource Management will tell landowners how they must manage their land.

Reality: Coordinated Resource Management is a program to make public land management more efficient by coordinating the efforts of public agencies, involving citizens in developing strategies for natural resource protection, and providing opportunities for willing landowners to participate in programs that will benefit them.

Myth: The Conservation Department's program called the Respect Landowners Initiative will ban coyote hunting and allow landowners to shoot dogs on their property.

Reality: The Respect Landowners Initiative addresses the related problems of illegal shooting from the roadway (roadhunting), pursuing deer with dogs (deer dogging), and free-running dogs. It will provide conservation agents with additional tools for law enforcement and help resolve conflicts between landowners and hunters through citizen involvement, effective deterrence and education.

Myth: The Conservation Department stocks rattlesnakes in the Ozarks.

Reality: No way.

One Last Reality Check - Myth or Reality? The "Outdoor Tattler," featured in this issue, is a true account of outdoor activities in Missouri.

Also in this issue

Outdoor Tattler

The only family tabloid to offer sensational, speculative, sleazy, sometimes true "inside" dirt from the outdoors.

Mill Creek School Reunion

Former students of a one-room school house relive their past each June at Peck Ranch Conservation Area.

I'm Too Smart for Them

Turkeys may be too stupid to appreciate the author's sophisticated approach to hunting.

King Crappie

Fishing for crappies in Missouri is better today because of special fishing regulations.

Show-Me Spring Squirrel Hunting

Finding a productive food source is the key to spring squirrel hunting.

The Wild Side

Can you smell spiders? Do young spiders go ballooning?

Whitetails on the Move

Missouri studies using radio transmitter collars suggest that deer may be more mobile than previously thought.

This Issue's Staff:

Editor - Kathy Love
Assistant Editor - Tom Cwynar
Managing Editor - Jim Auckley
Art Director - Dickson Stauffer
Artist - Dave Besenger
Artist - Mark Raithel
Composition - Kevin Binkley
Photographer - Jim Rathert
Photographer - Paul Childress
Staff Writer - Joan McKee
Staff Writer - Charlotte Overby
Composition - Libby Bode Block
Circulation - Bertha Bainer