MOre QuailMore posts

Winter Covey Headquarters Newsletter Now Available

Dec 23, 2011

The winter issue of “The Covey Headquarters Newsletter” has just been released. Check it out here. This free publication is published four times a year and is filled with timely habitat-management tips, suggestions and success stories from landowners throughout the Midwest. A small group of determined landowners started the newsletter 10 years ago at a workshop in Northwest Missouri. After receiving multiple questions of “What do I do now?” a group of wildlife biologists started the newsletter to provide timely information to landowners on a more regular basis, like a monthly reminder. As with any upland management, there is always something to do every month. This newsletter is a great reminder of what to do and when to do it, all in the name of quail and upland wildlife.

Sign up for an electronic copy of this newsletter here. If you would like a copy mailed to you, just send a request to “The Covey Headquarters,” 3915 Oakland Ave., St. Joseph, MO 64506.

honoring_the_point.jpg

Frank Loncarich approaches two dogs on point.
Fine Dog Work
Frank Loncarich approaches his pointer, Bailey, who has pinned down a large covey of quail. Watching good dog work is half the fun of bird hunting.

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