MOre QuailMore posts

What Plant Is This?

Jul 05, 2011

Call me crazy, but July is a great month to walk your fence lines, woody draws and CRP (conservation reserve program) fields. Why, you ask? Now is the time when several quail-friendly plants are flowering or producing seed and are relatively easy to identify.

Why do you need to be able to identify quail-friendly plants? To become a better quail manager! The end result of most management practices, such as prescribed burning, disking and edge feathering, is to create a diversity of plants.

A great way of evaluating your quail management practices is documenting the plant response. Did you disk a field to promote ragweed and end up with foxtail? This could be a sign that you disked too late--likely in March or April. Did you burn your warm-season grass field and can’t find any broadleaf plants? This could be a sign that you burned too late--likely in April. The point is that if you learn a few of the many quail-friendly plants, you can adjust your management to better promote these plants. Your quail will thank you for it!

A great source to assist you in identifying these plants is “Quail-Friendly Plants of the Midwest.” It is published by the University of Missouri Extension in cooperation with the Missouri Department of Conservation. The book goes into great detail on the various grasses, wildflowers and woody plants that quail prefer.

Get outside and learn your quail-favored plants and become a better quail manager. Be sure to take insect repellent and a camera to document your plants.

postburnprairie_06-30-11.jpg

Photo shows prairie plant response to prescribed burn
Prairie Plants Respond to Prescribed Burn
Important quail plants emerge the year following a summer prescribed burn.

Comments

Dear arb gate,thanks for the comments, if you would like us to address a particular topic related to quail, please let us know!!Bill

Hi, I’ve been a lurker around your blog for a few months. I love this article and your entire site! Looking forward to reading more!

Recent Posts

mistletoe berries

The Holiday Tree Thief

Dec 08, 2019

People have been stealing kisses under its branches for years, but in nature, mistletoe is the real thief. This parasite plant steals nutrients from trees. It also provides food and homes for birds and mammals. Discover where you can find it naturally in Missouri, in this week's Discover Nature Note.

kids birding

Christmas Bird Counts

Dec 02, 2019

You can help birds by joining Audubon's annual Christmas Bird Count.  These take place across the state and are part of the largest citizen-science effort in the United States.  Learn more about this important project and how birds are doing in this week's Discover Nature Notes blog.

turkey

The Thanksgiving Turkey

Nov 24, 2019

Wild turkeys are birds simmered in American tradition. Learn how they were restored, hunting tips, and how to prepare them from field to table in this week's Discover Nature Note.