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What to Do? Part 3

Mar 27, 2012

The Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) signup is upon us and it’s decision time! With current grain prices, many of you may be contemplating whether or not to re-enroll your CRP acres. One option for your consideration is presented below to help you make an educated decision on the future of your CRP. In the last few weeks we covered options for re-enrolling in CRP and options to take advantage of CRP buffers. In this, our final week of our three-part series, we cover farming your current CRP acres with a twist for wildlife!

Option Three: Production with Wildlife in Mind

Some expired CRP fields may remain in grass for hay or pasture. Landowners can still take advantage of Continuous CRP practices if they plan on haying or grazing the field; however, livestock will need to be excluded from the CRP buffer.

If you plan to return your CRP field to corn or beans, consider only farming the ridge-tops or flattest portions of the field. Keep the steeper slopes in CRP. These steep slopes were put in CRP for a reason and breaking them out of CRP may cause erosion problems. Plus, a mix of CRP and row-crop equals outstanding habitat for a variety of wildlife species.

disking_09-12-11.jpg

Landowner on tractor pulls disk field to promote ragweed growth
Disking Next to Cover

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