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The Way to Better Shotgun Skills

Aug 22, 2008

ShootingPart of being a good hunter means honing your skills so every shot you take counts. With the cost of ammunition rising, the incentive to do that just keeps growing too.

One way our staff are trying to help Missouri dove, waterfowl and upland game bird hunters be the best wing shooters they can be is through special training sessions in CONSEP, the Cooperative North American Shotgunning Education Program. Tony Legg, hunter education coordinator for the Missouri Conservation Department whose office is just down the hall from mine, heads up the program.

Several free seminar/workshop sessions will be held across the state from August into early October. Sign-up is necessary though, so our staff can limit the size of groups to ensure quality, individualized hands-on training.

What you learn is practical: how to better estimate distance, how to improve marksmanship skills and how to better match choke and shells. Tony mentioned, “I’ve had long-time hunters at the beginning of the program say they don’t expect they’ll learn much that’s new, but by the end of it, they’re amazed at how much better they’re able to shoot, especially with the nontoxic steel shot.”

So if you have any interest in being the best you can be and making the most of your time and ammunition too, check out the CONSEP schedule. See what Tony and our training team can do for you. You’ll be amazed or your money back! (Just kidding—it’s free. But you might still be amazed.)

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