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New Guide to Missouri Natural Areas

Mar 23, 2011

Cover of new natural areas guideHave you ever wished that you could board a time machine and visit Missouri’s original natural landscape as the early explorers saw it, before permanent settlers began the series of alterations that continue today? While we don’t see much of that natural landscape left today, there are remnants being preserved for posterity and many of those are found in our system of designated natural areas. The new Department publication "Discover Missouri Natural Areas – A guide to 50 great places" can help you locate and explore some of the state’s best remaining biological, ecological and geological features.

Guidebook author Mike Leahy teaches the basic concepts of natural communities and describes and maps the ecoregions of Missouri, providing context for the 50 featured areas. The stunning photographs will make you want to visit each site, and the descriptions will enhance your understanding and appreciation of each experience. Featured natural areas are found on properties managed by a number of state and federal agencies. Access to each site is described and a contact telephone number is provided for more detailed information. Easy-to-use maps show area roads, parking lots and established trails.

This new guidebook is available at Department offices that sell publications or can be ordered online or toll-free by phone (877-521-8632). The cost is $9 plus shipping. This spring is a great time to get outside and explore Missouri in its natural state.

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