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Work in Progress: Ditch Cleaning

Nov 16, 2009

image of ditch cleaning

Last week they were making progress along Ditch 111 and Ditch 106. Periodically dredging must be done to account for the sedimentation that occurs from the surrounding land. Large rain events can leave bare fields and ditch banks scoured and extremely eroded. This soil drops out of the water column as the water velocity slows down. Over time this can cause ditches to fill in, which compromises their ability to function and drain properly.

Maintaining ditch banks and occasionally dredging is necessary to ensure drainage. Typically, this responsibility falls to the drainage district. As we clean off our ditch banks we plan to reslope them in certain sections. This will reduce erosion and will allow the ditches to be easier and cheaper to maintain over the long term. In the same way, grass filter strips can be beneficial to farmers. Filter strips slow down water velocities and reduce the transportation of sediments and pollutants downstream. We all play a part in taking care of the land and water that runs through it. The future depends on it.

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