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Wells and Water Supply

Sep 28, 2009

Two of these wells are located at the southwest corner of Unit A, near blind 16. They provide the bulk of the water for flooding Blinds 15, 16, 10, 11, 8 and 13 and also provide water to the Luken Farm Refuge. Two smaller wells exist on the west and north portions of Unit A and provide water to 48S, 48N, H-Pool, 14, 18 and 19.

There are no wells that supply water to pools 2 and 3, which are flooded by diverting water from the Pool 1 reservoir. Pool 2 can be partially flooded through its water control structures near B-1 blind from Ditch 104 to the north and near J-1 blind from Ditch 106 to the south. Pool 3 can receive water from Ditch 105 across the low-water crossing on the east side and from the water control structures on the southwest and northwest corners of the pool from Ditch 1. Taking water from the ditches can only happen when large quantities of rainfall stack the water in the ditches higher than the bottom of the pools. One large rain event is capable of filling both pools, while several smaller events may not. The amount of water captured depends on how high the water levels rise in the ditches and how long it remains elevated.

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