Table Hc04: Habitat Features and Definitions Used in the Bourbeuse River Watershed

Table Hc04: Habitat Features and Definitions Used in the Bourbeuse River Watershed

List of habitat features and definitions used in the Bourbeuse River watershed habitat assessment based on McCain et al. 1990.

Low Gradient Riffles (LGR)
shallow reaches with swiftly flowing, turbulent water with some partially exposed substrate. Gradient < 4%, substrate is usually cobble dominated.
High Gradient Riffles (HGR)
steep reaches of moderately deep, swift, and very turbulent water. Amount of exposed substrate is relatively great. Gradient is > 4%, and substrate is boulder dominated.
Cascade (CAS)
The steepest riffle habitat, consists of alternating small waterfalls and shallow pools. Substrate is usually bedrock and boulders.
Secondary Channel Pool (SCP)
pools formed outside the average wetted channel. During summer, these pools will dry up or have very little flow. Mainly associated with gravel bars and may contain sand and silt substrates.
Backwater Pool, Boulder Formed (BWPB)
found along channel margins and caused by eddies around boulders. These pools are usually shallow and are dominated by fine-grain substrates. Current velocities are quite low.
Backwater Pool, Rootwad Formed (BWPR)
found along channel margins and caused by eddies around rootwads. These pools are usually shallow and are dominated by fine-grain substrates. Current velocities are quite low.
Backwater Pool, Log Formed (BWPL)
found along channel margins and caused by eddies around woody debris. These pools are usually shallow and are dominated by fine-grain substrates. Current velocities are quite low.
Backwater Pool, w/ associated gravel bar (BWPG)
found along channel margins and caused by eddies around gravel bars. These pools are usually shallow and are dominated by fine-grain substrates. Current velocities are quite low.
Trench/Chute (TRC)
channel cross sections typically U-shaped with bedrock or coarse grained bottom flanked by bedrock walls. Current velocities are swift and the direction of flow is uniform. May be pool-like.
Plunge Pool (PLP)
found where stream passes over a complete or nearly complete channel obstruction and drops steeply into the streambed below, scouring out a depression, often large and deep. Substrate size is highly variable.
Lateral Scour Pool, Log Formed (LSPL)
formed by impinging against one streambank or against a partial obstruction of a log or other woody debris. The associated scour is confined to < 60% of wetted channel width.
Lateral Scour Pool, Rootwad Formed (LSPR)
formed by impinging against rootwads creating a partial channel obstruction. The associated scour is confined to < 60% of wetted channel width.
Lateral Scour Pool, Bedrock Formed (LSPB)
formed by impinging against bedrock creating a partial channel obstruction. The associated scour is confined to < 60% of wetted channel width.
Lateral Scour Pool, Boulder Formed (LSP)
formed by impinging against boulders that create a partial channel obstruction. The associated scour is confined to < 60% of wetted channel width.
Dammed Pool (DPL)
water impounded from a complete or nearly complete channel blockage (debris jams, rock landslides, or beaver dams). Substrate tends toward smaller gravels and sand.
Glides (GLD)
a wide shallow pool flowing smoothly and gently, with low to moderate velocities and little or no surface turbulence. Substrate usually consists of cobble, gravel and sand.
Run (RUN)
swiftly flowing reaches with little surface agitation and no major flow obstructions. Often appears as flooded riffles. Typical substrates are gravel, cobble and boulders.
Step Run (SRN)
a sequence of runs separated by short riffle steps. Substrates are usually cobble and boulder dominated.
Mid-Channel Pool (MCP)
large pools formed by mid-channel scour. The scour hole encompasses more than 60% of the wetted channel. Water velocity is slow, and the substrate is highly variable.
Edgewater (EGW)
quiet, shallow, area found along the margins of the stream, typically associated with riffles. Water velocity is low and sometimes lacking. Substrate varies from cobbles to boulders.
Channel Confluence Pool (CCP)
large pools formed at the confluence of two or more channels. Scour can be due to plunges, lateral obstructions or down scour at the channel intersections. Velocity and turbulence are usually greater than those in other pool types.
Pocket Water (POW)
a section of swift flowing stream containing numerous boulders or other large obstructions which create eddies or scour holes (pockets) behind the obstructions.

Key Messages: 

Conservation pays by enriching our economy and quality of life.

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