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Content tagged with "animals"

Photograph of American White Pelican in flight

American White Pelican in Flight

In flight pelicans may either flap their wings or soar. They typically fly with their heads back on their body, not with necks extended.

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Photograph of an American White Pelican swimming

American White Pelican Swimming

American white pelicans are very large, with a white body, black wing tips, and black partial trailing edge; the skin of legs and pouch and the huge bill are yellow to orange.

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Photograph of American White Pelicans flying in formation

American White Pelicans Flying in Formation

Large flocks of pelicans flap and soar as they circle higher and higher. At a considerable altitude, they may veer off in one direction as a single-line or V-shaped pattern.

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Photograph of American White Pelicans flying above water surface

American White Pelicans Skimming Water Surface

In Missouri, the American white pelican is a common transient on large lakes, reservoirs, and marshes. Nonbreeding birds may linger during summer. they may rarely occur on open water in winter.

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Photo of a female American wigeon floating on water.

American Wigeon Female

The female American wigeon has a gray bill and head, a dark eye spot, rusty sides, and a grayish patch on the wing.

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Photo of a male American wigeon floating on water.

American Wigeon Male

The adult male American wigeon has a white forehead, a gray head, a green band from the eye down the back of the neck, a grayish back, a rusty brown breast and sides, and in flight a large white patch on the forward edge of the wing. The rear end is black, preceded by white.

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Photo of a male American wigeon swimming on water.

American Wigeon Male

The male American wigeon can be distinguished from the male green-winged teal (which also has a green stripe running from the eye down the back of the neck) by the wigeon's white forehead and crown. Some people call the American wigeon the “baldpate” (baldhead), for the male’s white cap and forehead.

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