Content tagged with "plants"

Bitterweed (Bitter Sneezeweed; Yellow Dog-Fennel)

Photo of blooming bitterweed plant shown from top.
The weediest sneezeweed in Missouri, bitterweed arrived here in the late 1800s from its home range in Texas and Louisiana. Like other sneezeweeds, it has domed disks and yellow fan-shaped, notched ray florets. Unlike them, the leaves are narrowly linear. More

Bitterweed (Bitter Sneezeweed; Yellow Dog-Fennel)

Photo of bitterweed flowerheads.
Once you learn to identify sneezeweeds in general, with their distinctive dome-shaped disks and fan-shaped ray flowers, use other characteristics to determine species. Here, the fewer (5–10) ray flowers and narrowly linear leaves separate bitterweed from our other common all-yellow sneezeweed, autumn sneezeweed. More

Black Medick

Photo of black medick, a yellow, cloverlike wildflower, held in a hand
Black medick occurs in fields, lawns, waste places, and along roads and railroads. A native of Eurasia and Africa, it was introduced and has naturalized across much of North America. It is a nutritious but low-yielding legume for grazing animals and is not much planted in our area. More

Black Medick (Flower)

Photo of black medick closeup of cloverlike yellow flowerhead
The small, cloverlike flowering heads and trifoliate leaves of black medick are clues that this plant is in the Fabaceae, the bean or pea family. An introduced, weedy species, it is closely related to alfalfa. More

Black Mustard

Photo of black mustard plant growing in cracked pavement
A native of Eurasia, black mustard is weedy and grows in fields, waste places, roadsides, and other disturbed areas. Until it was recently replaced by another species (brown mustard, which also is naturalized in Missouri) black mustard was the chief source of seed used in making table mustard. More

Black Mustard

Photo of black mustard plants on the edge of a field
Black mustard can grow to 5 feet tall. Next time you breeze past weedy black mustard on the highway or spot it in a fallow field, think of how important this and other mustards are to the world economy – and to your dinner table. More