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Content tagged with "plants"

Photo of an ashy sunflower flowerhead, plus several stems, leaves, and buds.

Ashy Sunflower

Sunflowers provide nectar and pollen to a great variety of insects, plus a hunting ground for spiders, assassin bugs, and other predators of the many insects attracted to the nectar and pollen. When the flowers are spent, birds and mammals, including finches and rodents, relish the sunflower seeds.

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Photo of the base of an ashy sunflower flowerhead, showing involucral bracts.

Ashy Sunflower (Involucre)

The overlapping bracts (called involucral bracts) beneath the flowerhead of ashy sunflower are many, narrow, and covered with hairs.

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Photo of ashy sunflower stem showing two opposite, sessile leaves.

Ashy Sunflower (Leaves)

The leaves of ashy sunflower are opposite, sessile, broadly ovate, stiff, and densely gray-hairy, with inconspicuous teeth.

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Photo of many blooming ashy sunflower plants, showing gray-green leaves.

Ashy Sunflower Colony

Ashy sunflower is a native perennial wildflower that usually grows in colonies. It’s most often encountered in prairies in all but the southeastern quarter of the state.

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Photo of many blooming ashy sunflower plants, showing gray-green leaves.

Ashy Sunflower Colony

Colonies of ashy sunflowers, with their sunny yellow blossoms and grayish foliage, make a striking late summer display in our native tallgrass prairies.

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Autumn Olive, fruit

Autumn Olive (Fruit)

Fruits ripen from pink to red, with speckles. They are finely dotted with pale scales and are produced in abundance each year.

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Autumn olive, underside of leaf

Autumn Olive (Underside of Leaf)

The lower surface is covered with silvery white scales, a conspicuous characteristic that can be seen from a distance.

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