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Content tagged with "plants"

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Black Walnut Catkins

Male flowers appear in drooping catkins when leaves emerge in spring.

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Black Walnut Tree

Black walnut trees grow up to 90 feet tall with a rounded, open crown.

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Black Walnut Twig Cross Section

Twigs thick, light brown, with fuzzy buds and tan, chambered pith at the core of the twig.

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Photo of black-eyed Susan flowerhead.

Black-Eyed Susan

Black-eyed Susan is popular as a native garden ornamental and is often sold as a cut flower. Historically, Native Americans used this and other Rudbeckia species medicinally.

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Photo of black-eyed Susan flowerheads.

Black-Eyed Susan

Black-eyed Susan is a tremendously popular native wildflower for gardening. It’s also commonly planted along roadways, so when it’s blooming, May through October, you’re sure to see it somewhere.

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Photo of several black-eyed Susan flowers.

Black-Eyed Susan

Its profusion of cheery, bright yellow flowers make black-eyed Susan one of our most beloved wildflowers. It is one of nine species of Rudbeckia recorded in Missouri, and it is the most familiar.

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Photo of black-eyed Susan plants blooming along the edge of a field.

Black-Eyed Susan

Black-eyed Susan commonly grows in pastures, old fields, railroads, roadsides, and open, disturbed areas. This is the most abundant rudbeckia in Missouri and the one that prospers best in disturbed habitats.

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