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Content tagged with "plants"

Photo of bird’s-foot trefoil plant with flowers

Bird’s-Foot Trefoil

Bird’s-foot trefoil forms low patches of bright yellow flowers along roadsides, having been planted to stabilize soil after road construction. Up close, it clearly has pea flowers. The leaves are trifoliate, with two leafy stipules at the base of each.

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Photo of bird’s-foot trefoil plant with flowers

Bird’s-Foot Trefoil

Bird’s-foot trefoil produces its bright golden yellow flowers from May to September. A native of Europe, it has a worldwide distribution. It is used as a low-growing groundcover, soil stabilizer, and forage and cover crop.

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Photo of bird's-foot violet (bicolored form)

Bird’s-Foot Violet (Purple and Lavender Form)

One of the color variations of bird’s-foot violet has 2 deep purple petals on top, and 3 lavender petals below. Also called “pansy violet” and “hens and roosters,” this spring wildflower can make a glade or bluff top heavenly with its pretty lavender and purple “faces.” When you see your first big colony of bird’s-foot violets, you will probably never forget it.

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Photo of 2 bitter bolete mushrooms showing top and underside of caps and stalk.

Bitter Bolete

The bitter bolete has a large, smooth, tannish brown cap with pinkish white pores and a webbed, tannish brown stalk. The cap often cracks with age. It grows singly or scattered on the ground in mixed woods.

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Photo of broken bitter bolete mushroom cap, being held to show pores

Bitter Bolete (Pores)

A broken bitter bolete cap, showing the long pinkish pore tubes.

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Illustration of bitternut hickory leaves and nuts.

Bitternut Hickory

Bitternut hickory, Carya cordiformis.

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Photo of bitterweed plant, side view, showing very narrow leaves and branching.

Bitterweed (Bitter Sneezeweed; Yellow Dog-Fennel)

Bitterweed is our only sneezeweed with such very narrow leaves. Note also the many branches that form at the top part of the plant. Unlike our other sneezeweeds, this one lacks winged stems; it only has fine, rounded, lengthwise ridges. Also unlike our other sneezeweeds, it is an annual plant, not perennial, and it is not native to Missouri.

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Photo of young bitterweed plant, showing basal whorl of dandelion-like leaves.

Bitterweed (Bitter Sneezeweed; Yellow Dog-Fennel)

The basal leaves of bitterweed look something like dandelion leaves. They usually wither away by flowering time. If you look closely or use a hand lens, you can see tiny yellow glands dotting the leaf tissues.

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Photo of field dominated by blooming bitterweed, with cattle trying to graze it.

Bitterweed (Bitter Sneezeweed; Yellow Dog-Fennel)

Bitterweed, and other sneezeweeds, are called “increasers” in pastures. This means that when a field is overgrazed, these plants tend to increase, and maybe even take over the whole field, over time. In this case, bitter, toxic chemicals in the plant cause cattle to avoid eating them and instead to eat nearly any other plant within reach.

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