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Content tagged with "Wildflowers, Grasses and Other Nonwoody Plants"

Photo of Florida lettuce flower closeup with syrphid fly

Florida Lettuce (Woodland Lettuce)

Lactuca floridana
A true lettuce that can be eaten as a cooked or salad green, Florida lettuce has lavender to purplish blue flowers and grows statewide.

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Photo of flowering spurge flowers

Flowering Spurge

Euphorbia corollata
With widespread sprays of small white flowers, flowering spurge looks a lot like the "baby's breath" so popular with florists. Each little "flower" has 5 white "false petals" surrounding a cup of tiny yellow male flowers and a single female flower.

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Photo of Fremont’s leather flower

Fremont’s Leather Flower

Clematis fremontii
The only non-climbing clematis in the state, Fremont’s leather flower is a shrubby perennial with bell-shaped flowers. It grows on open glades in the eastern part of Missouri and in southwestern Missouri’s Ozark County.

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French Grass

Orbexilum onobrychis (formerly Psoralea onobrychis)
Looking absolutely nothing like a grass, French grass, a legume, bears upright spikes of pale purple flowers on long stems from the leaf axils. The leaves are trifoliate, resembling those of soybeans.

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Photo of garlic mustard plant with flowers

Garlic Mustard

Alliaria petiolata
Because each plant disperses a large number of seeds, garlic mustard can outcompete native vegetation for light, moisture, nutrients, soil, and space as it quickly colonizes an area.

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Photo of a geocarpon plant showing stems and foliage

Geocarpon (Earth Fruit; Tiny Tim)

Geocarpon minimum
Geocarpon is a minute, inconspicuous plant found almost exclusively on sandstone glade outcrops. Extremely rare, it is a Species of Conservation Concern. It is related to carnations! Efforts are being made to keep this unique plant from disappearing from our state.

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Photo of a giant ragweed plant.

Giant Ragweed (Horse Weed; Great Ragweed; Buffalo Weed)

Ambrosia trifida
Large stands of wind-pollinated giant ragweed commonly form in disturbed areas, causing late-summer misery in the form of hay fever for many Missourians.

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Photo of glade coneflower flowerhead showing yellow pollen

Glade Coneflower

Echinacea simulata
One of Missouri’s five types of echinacea, glade coneflower is distinguished by its yellow pollen, drooping pink or purple ray flowers, and narrow, tapering leaves. Look for it in the eastern Ozarks, and at native plant nurseries!

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Photo of goat's beard plant with flower clusters

Goat’s Beard

Aruncus dioicus
Goat’s beard is named for its bold, branching, plumelike clusters of flowers. Look for it growing in rich soils in low woods and north-facing slopes, bases of bluffs, and other moist places in the southeastern half of our state.

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Photo of goat's rue showing flower cluster

Goat’s Rue (Hoary Pea)

Tephrosia virginiana
Two-colored flowers of pink and light yellow make goat's rue easy to identify. Look for this legume in rocky, open woods, savannas, prairies, glades, and fields.

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