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Content tagged with "Birds"

Gray Partridge

Perdix perdix
Introduced from Eurasia and uncommon in Missouri, the gray partridge is a favorite of gamebird hunters.

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Photo of great blue heron

Great Blue Heron

Ardea herodias
This large, graceful, blue-gray bird with a black, plumed eye line has long legs for wading and a slender neck and spearlike bill for catching fish.

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Photo of a great horned owl on a tree branch

Great Horned Owl

Bubo virginianus
This large owl has wide-set ear tufts and a white throat, but if it’s dark, you can identify it with your ears by its series of three to eight deep hoots grouped in a pattern, such as “hoo hoohoohoo hoo hoo.”

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Photo of a male greater prairie-chicken in courtship display

Greater Prairie-Chicken

Tympanuchus cupido
This rare bird breeds in select grasslands in the spring, filling the air with their unusual booming calls. With their numbers dwindling, prairie-chickens need strong conservation support.

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Photo of a greater roadrunner, side view

Greater Roadrunner

Geococcyx californianus
Though most Americans associate the roadrunner with the desert Southwest, this species has been expanding its range over the past century and is now found as far as southwestern Missouri and western Louisiana.

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Green-Winged Teal

Green-Winged Teal

Anas crecca
The green-winged teal is a fast, graceful flyer with an iridescent green wing patch. Teals are relatively small dabbling ducks and have been called the “bantams of the duck tribe.”

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Image of harris's sparrow

Harris's Sparrow

Zonotrichia querula
Harris's sparrows nest in the stunted boreal forest of the extreme north, but winter in brushy fields and open woods of the nation's heartland.

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Photograph of a male Hooded Merganser swimming

Hooded Merganser

Lophodytes cucullatus
Hooded mergansers have crests that trail behind the head or can be raised to create a circular shape. Their bills are narrow and serrated. Males are black and white with chestnut flanks; females are brown.

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Photograph of a male House Finch

House Finch

Haemorhous mexicanus
A time traveler from the 1970s or before would be amazed to see so many house finches in Missouri, for they are native to the West. Learn about this now-common backyard bird.

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Image of a house sparrow

House Sparrow

Passer domesticus
The house sparrow was brought to America from Europe in hopes of controlling insects. As it turns out, it prefers seeds to insects and has become a pest. House sparrows (sometimes called English sparrows) compete with many native birds for nesting cavities and bird nesting boxes.

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