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Published on: Jun. 30, 2010

ReLeaf will host a special event Sept. 30 at its CommuniTree Gardens nursery in St. Louis County to celebrate the distribution of 100,000 free trees throughout Missouri and plant the 100,000th tree.

Forest ReLeaf has worked collaboratively with thousands of Missouri volunteers to grow and distribute trees for plantings in parks, neighborhoods, nonprofits and municipalities. To learn more about the programs sponsored by Forest ReLeaf, visit www.moreleaf.org.


10 Commandments dor Camping in Bear Country

When Missourians think of “bear country,” we usually picture Yellowstone National Park or the Great Smoky Mountains. However, Missouri has a growing black bear population, so bear awareness needs to be part of camping close to home, too. Bears are most common south of Interstate 44, where many of the state’s most popular camping spots are located. Campers can avoid bear problems by following these simple rules.

If a bear enters your campsite, shout, wave your arms and use an air horn or bang pots and pans to make noise. Throw rocks and sticks at the bear. If it does not leave, get in a vehicle and honk the horn. If the bear does not leave, call a conservation agent or local law-enforcement agency.

The Conservation Department wants to know about bear sightings. If you see one, please call 573-882-9880. You can find a bear reporting form at www.MissouriConservation.org/18427. For information about living with bears, visit www.MissouriConservation.org/7835.

1. NEVER FEED BEARS

Feeding breaks down black bears’ natural fear of people.

2. KEEP A CLEAN CAMP

Bears find food scraps and wrappers irresistible.

3. WASH UTENSILS AFTER COOKING

Bears’ keen sense of smell can detect food odors long after cooking is done.

4. START FOOD PREP AT HOME

Peeling and slicing vegetables, cooking meat and doing other food preparation at home reduces bear temptations in camp.

5. STORE FOOD IN AIRTIGHT CONTAINERS

Sealing up food minimizes tantalizing aromas. At night, keep food locked in a vehicle.

6. DON’T COOK OR EAT IN TENTS

With people hidden from view, a bear can mistake a tent for a food source.

7. KEEP GARBAGE SEALED UP

Double-bag refuse and lock it in a car trunk or airtight container.

8. TREAT SCENTED ITEMS LIKE FOOD

Soap, cosmetics and other scented items smell like food to bears.

9. NEVER APPROACH BEARS

Bears are potentially dangerous wildlife, not movie characters.

10. KEEP DOGS LEASHED

Bears normally flee when they encounter people, but if confronted by dogs they defend themselves.


Building Better Blue Cats at Truman Reservoir and Lake Ozark.

In our 2002 Statewide Catfish Angler Survey, nearly 50

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