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Annual Report Fiscal Year 2004–2005

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Published on: Jan. 2, 2006

Last revision: Nov. 22, 2010

This summary of the Annual Report highlights the Conservation Department’s accomplishments and expenditures from July 1, 2004, through June 30, 2005. These accomplishments are based on the three components of the Department’s mission statement

“To protect and manage the fish, forest and wildlife resources of the state.”

Bagnell Dam/AmerenUE Settlement:  The settlement agreement asks the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to adopt specific conditions to protect the fishery and wetland resources affected by the relicensing of Bagnell Dam/AmerenUE power generation utility. If accepted, the benefits to the natural resources, and the multi-billion dollar Lake of the Ozarks tourism industry, will extend for the 40-year life of the new license. At Lake of the Ozarks, fish kills will be minimized, critical habitats protected and adequate water levels retained. Water quality and habitat improvements will be provided for the 82 miles of the Osage River below Bagnell Dam.

Mississippi River Sturgeon Regulations:  In cooperation with Illinois, Kentucky and Tennessee, the Department established new regulations on the commercial harvest of shovelnose sturgeon in the Mississippi River. These regulations are designed to protect the sturgeon population from overharvest due to the worldwide demand for caviar.

Catfish Harvest Management Study: In 2004, a 5-year catfish harvest management study was initiated to learn about flathead and blue catfish ecology and population dynamics. In 2005, more than 8,000 catfish were captured, tagged and released; it is the largest such study ever conducted. Monitoring population and size-class changes will provide better information to manage these popular sportfish. The study will also look at spawning behavior and catfish movement.

Healthy Forests: Over 53,000 acres of forestland were actively managed during the 2004–05 fiscal year. Missouri’s public forests are managed to promote forest health and sustainability. Additionally, managed forests provide opportunities for hiking, equestrian use, birding, hunting and numerous other activities.

Conserving All Wildlife in Missouri: The Comprehensive Wildlife Conservation Strategy was completed and submitted to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It is a federal requirement that will allow Missourians to obtain additional federal funds. The strategy describes the Department’s plans for conserving native plants and animals and the habitats they depend upon.

Quail and Grassland Bird Habitat: The Department emphasized restoration of quail and grassland bird habitats on Department lands, implemented regional quail/grassland bird action plans, and identified prospective private landowner cooperatives within quail focus areas. Quail and bird population monitoring was implemented to evaluate management actions.

“To serve the public and facilitate their participation in resource management activities.”

Telecheck: The new Telecheck system allows hunters to check deer and turkey by phone or online. The Department estimates it will save $500,000 a year with this system.

Private Land Services staff made 6,087 onsite landowner visits to offer technical assistance in the development of habitat management plans and handled 5,280 requests for wildlife nuisance and/or damage assistance, including 696 on-site visits.

Share the Harvest: Through this program, hunters, in partnership with established charitable organizations, donate deer meat to those in need. Conservation agents coordinate the Share the Harvest program with the Conservation Federation of Missouri. During fiscal year 2004–05, 5,161 hunters donated 275,374 pounds of venison.

Rural Volunteer Fire Department Grants: Each year the Forestry Division, in cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service, provides grants to rural volunteer fire departments. In fiscal year 2004–05, 179 rural fire departments received over $380,000 in grants that funded equipment, special clothing and training.

Cost-share Funds for Private Landowners: Over $1.1 million in cost-share funds were delivered to approximately 850 private landowners to implement beneficial habitat management practices targeting fish, forest and wildlife resources.

"To provide opportunity for all citizens to use, enjoy and learn about fish, forest and wildlife resources."

Mississippi River Sturgeon Regulations: In cooperation with Illinois, Kentucky and Tennessee, the Department established new regulations on the commercial harvest of shovelnose sturgeon in the Mississippi River. These regulations are designed to protect the sturgeon population from overharvest due to the worldwide demand for caviar.

Catfish Harvest Management Study: In 2004, a 5-year catfish harvest management study was initiated to learn about flathead and blue catfish ecology and population dynamics. In 2005, more than 8,000 catfish were captured, tagged and released; it is the largest such study ever conducted. Monitoring population and size-class changes will provide better information to manage these popular sportfish. The study will also look at spawning behavior and catfish movement.

Healthy Forests: Over 53,000 acres of forestland were actively managed during the 2004–05 fiscal year. Missouri’s public forests are managed to promote forest health and sustainability. Additionally, managed forests provide opportunities for hiking, equestrian use, birding, hunting and numerous other activities.

Conserving All Wildlife in Missouri: The Comprehensive Wildlife Conservation Strategy was completed and submitted to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It is a federal requirement that will allow Missourians to obtain additional federal funds. The strategy describes the Department’s plans for conserving native plants and animals and the habitats they depend upon.

Quail and Grassland Bird Habitat: The Department emphasized restoration of quail and grassland bird habitats on Department lands, implemented regional quail/grassland bird action plans, and identified prospective private landowner cooperatives within quail focus areas. Quail and bird population monitoring was implemented to evaluate management actions.

“To serve the public and facilitate their participation in resource management activities.”

Telecheck: The new Telecheck system allows hunters to check deer and turkey by phone or online. The Department estimates it will save $500,000 a year with this system.

Private Land Services staff made 6,087 onsite landowner visits to offer technical assistance in the development of habitat management plans and handled 5,280 requests for wildlife nuisance and/or damage assistance, including 696 on-site visits.

Share the Harvest: Through this program, hunters, in partnership with established charitable organizations, donate deer meat to those in need. Conservation agents coordinate the Share the Harvest program with the Conservation Federation of Missouri. During fiscal year 2004–05, 5,161 hunters donated 275,374 pounds of venison.

Rural Volunteer Fire Department Grants: Each year the Forestry Division, in cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service, provides grants to rural volunteer fire departments. In fiscal year 2004–05, 179 rural fire departments received over $380,000 in grants that funded equipment, special clothing and training.

Cost-share Funds for Private Landowners: Over $1.1 million in cost-share funds were delivered to approximately 850 private landowners to implement beneficial habitat management practices targeting fish, forest and wildlife resources.

“To provide opportunity for all citizens to use, enjoy and learn about fish, forest and wildlife resources.”

New Cape Girardeau Conservation Nature Center opened May 2005 and focuses on southeast Missouri’s unique habitats and history. Indoor exhibits include a beaver lodge, swamp, Native American artifacts and more. The outdoors offers ponds and walking trails through forested hills and wetlands.

The “Learning Outdoors” Program was initiated to better help Missouri schools teach children what it takes to keep our fish, forests and wildlife—all nature—thriving. Grants for field trips, outdoor classrooms and learning kits will be integrated with teaching units to meet the demands of student testing as well as the joy of learning.

Deer Hunting: Unlimited antlerless deer permits were available for many Missouri counties (249,518 permits sold) and many more no-cost any-deer and antlerless deer permits were made available free to resident landowners (325,353 permits). The Department annually conducts the Managed Deer Hunt Program providing an additional 73 hunts on state and federal lands. Urban deer harvest opportunities were expanded to maintain deer populations at homeowner-desired herd levels, while satisfying the desires of the growing number of urban hunters.

Youth Hunting: Youth-only portions of deer, turkey and waterfowl hunting seasons not only preserve family values related to hunting traditions, but create opportunities for youth to develop strong personal connections to nature.

What the Money Bought – Fiscal Year 2005

County Assistance Payments—$1,339,405 Includes payments to Missouri’s 114 counties for levee and drainage district taxes, forest cropland payments, payments in lieu of real estate taxes and county aid road trust payments. The five largest payments were to Shannon ($104,514), St. Louis ($52,529), Howard ($48,215), Lincoln ($43,618), and Holt ($38,656) counties.

Fisheries—$11,278,187 Managed 897 lakes and 40 stream management areas for public fishing. Over 840,000 people bought fishing permits making fishing one of the most popular outdoor activities in Missouri. Fish hatcheries produced about 8.4 million fish, stocking many farm ponds, reservoirs and streams.

Forestry—$14,987,545 Fostered a healthy and growing forest resource. Examples include distributing 5 million seedlings for planting to nearly 13,000 landowners, developing 180 Landowner Forest Stewardship Plans, bringing an additional 29,000 acres under total resource management, managing 438,700 acres of public forest land, monitoring insect and disease threats, and facilitating development of the state’s forest industry.

Wildlife—$15,106,140 Worked towards ensuring wildlife populations that are in harmony with habitat and human enjoyment. Managed 513,776 acres of public land and conducted programs to monitor game and non-game species, develop wetlands and restore wildlife.

Resource Science—$11,669,901 Provided the science-based information needed to effectively manage Missouri’s natural resources. Resource Science monitors the status of Missouri’s forests, fish, and wildlife, recommends conservation actions, evaluates these actions, and reports the results. In addition to surveys of fish and wildlife, more than 200,000 Missourians were contacted to determine their outdoor activities and opinions about conservation programs.

Protection—$13,470,876 Paid for law enforcement in every county as well as resource management, information, education and public service contact activities conducted by 167 conservation agents who directly contacted 513,792 people. A joint investigation with Iowa resulted in over 200 citations and in excess of $36,000 in fines to individuals who unlawfully bought resident permits in both states. Conservation agents, along with 2,200 volunteer instructors conducted 1,072 hunter education classes, certifying 20,046 students.

Outreach and Education—$16,092,745 Sustained and nourished Missourians’ connection to the outdoors by providing educational materials, schoolteacher contacts, outdoor skills programs, the Missouri Conservationist magazine, TV show, books, videos, informational programs, staffed shooting ranges and conservation nature centers.

Private Land Services—$6,766,496 Helped private landowners to achieve long-term conservation of natural resources and their land-use objectives. Delivered over $1.1 million in cost-share funds to approximately 850 private landowners; provided on-site technical assistance to over 6,000 private landowners; improved habitat for quail and grassland songbirds on over 10,700 acres of private land; helped landowners enroll almost 6,800 acres into the Wetland Reserve Program; and assisted almost 5,300 private landowners in controlling nuisance wildlife.

Administration—$2,350,815 Paid for audits, legal counsel, planning, environmental coordination, local government assistance, summer help and general expenses and equipment.

Administrative Services and Human Resources—$27,243,693 Paid for human resources, federal reimbursement administration, hunting and fishing permit point-of-sale system, fiscal services, distribution center, print shop, fleet management, vehicle and equipment maintenance centers, and information management and technology. Also includes other agency appropriations, Department-wide equipment and other essential services.

Construction and Development—$16,242,558 Work included fish hatchery improvements, development of nature centers, river accesses, wetlands, shooting ranges and renovation and repair of facilities statewide.

Design and Development—$11,082,357 Paid for building and grounds maintenance, engineering and architectural services.

New Cape Girardeau Conservation Nature Center opened May 2005 and focuses on southeast Missouri’s unique habitats and history. Indoor exhibits include a beaver lodge, swamp, Native American artifacts and more. The outdoors offers ponds and walking trails through forested hills and wetlands.

The “Learning Outdoors” Program was initiated to better help Missouri schools teach children what it takes to keep our fish, forests and wildlife—all nature—thriving. Grants for field trips, outdoor classrooms and learning kits will be integrated with teaching units to meet the demands of student testing as well as the joy of learning.

Deer Hunting: Unlimited antlerless deer permits were available for many Missouri counties (249,518 permits sold) and many more no-cost any-deer and antlerless deer permits were made available free to resident landowners (325,353 permits). The Department annually conducts the Managed Deer Hunt Program providing an additional 73 hunts on state and federal lands. Urban deer harvest opportunities were expanded to maintain deer populations at homeowner-desired herd levels, while satisfying the desires of the growing number of urban hunters.

Youth Hunting: Youth-only portions of deer, turkey and waterfowl hunting seasons not only preserve family values related to hunting traditions, but create opportunities for youth to develop strong personal connections to nature.

What the Money Bought—Fiscal Year 2005

Mississippi River Sturgeon Regulations: In cooperation with Illinois, Kentucky and Tennessee, the Department established new regulations on the commercial harvest of shovelnose sturgeon in the Mississippi River. These regulations are designed to protect the sturgeon population from overharvest due to the worldwide demand for caviar.

Catfish Harvest Management Study: In 2004, a 5-year catfish harvest management study was initiated to learn about flathead and blue catfish ecology and population dynamics. In 2005, more than 8,000 catfish were captured, tagged and released; it is the largest such study ever conducted. Monitoring population and size-class changes will provide better information to manage these popular sportfish. The study will also look at spawning behavior and catfish movement.

Healthy Forests: Over 53,000 acres of forestland were actively managed during the 2004–05 fiscal year. Missouri’s public forests are managed to promote forest health and sustainability. Additionally, managed forests provide opportunities for hiking, equestrian use, birding, hunting and numerous other activities.

Conserving All Wildlife in Missouri: The Comprehensive Wildlife Conservation Strategy was completed and submitted to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It is a federal requirement that will allow Missourians to obtain additional federal funds. The strategy describes the Department’s plans for conserving native plants and animals and the habitats they depend upon.

Quail and Grassland Bird Habitat: The Department emphasized restoration of quail and grassland bird habitats on Department lands, implemented regional quail/grassland bird action plans, and identified prospective private landowner cooperatives within quail focus areas. Quail and bird population monitoring was implemented to evaluate management actions.

“To serve the public and facilitate their participation in resource management activities.”

Telecheck: The new Telecheck system allows hunters to check deer and turkey by phone or online. The Department estimates it will save $500,000 a year with this system.

Private Land Services staff made 6,087 onsite landowner visits to offer technical assistance in the development of habitat management plans and handled 5,280 requests for wildlife nuisance and/or damage assistance, including 696 on-site visits.

Share the Harvest: Through this program, hunters, in partnership with established charitable organizations, donate deer meat to those in need. Conservation agents coordinate the Share the Harvest program with the Conservation Federation of Missouri. During fiscal year 2004–05, 5,161 hunters donated 275,374 pounds of venison.

Rural Volunteer Fire Department Grants: Each year the Forestry Division, in cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service, provides grants to rural volunteer fire departments. In fiscal year 2004–05, 179 rural fire departments received over $380,000 in grants that funded equipment, special clothing and training.

Cost-share Funds for Private Landowners: Over $1.1 million in cost-share funds were delivered to approximately 850 private landowners to implement beneficial habitat management practices targeting fish, forest and wildlife resources.

“To provide opportunity for all citizens to use, enjoy and learn about fish, forest and wildlife resources.”

New Cape Girardeau Conservation Nature Center opened May 2005 and focuses on southeast Missouri’s unique habitats and history. Indoor exhibits include a beaver lodge, swamp, Native American artifacts and more. The outdoors offers ponds and walking trails through forested hills and wetlands.

The “Learning Outdoors” Program was initiated to better help Missouri schools teach children what it takes to keep our fish, forests and wildlife—all nature—thriving. Grants for field trips, outdoor classrooms and learning kits will be integrated with teaching units to meet the demands of student testing as well as the joy of learning.

Deer Hunting: Unlimited antlerless deer permits were available for many Missouri counties (249,518 permits sold) and many more no-cost any-deer and antlerless deer permits were made available free to resident landowners (325,353 permits). The Department annually conducts the Managed Deer Hunt Program providing an additional 73 hunts on state and federal lands. Urban deer harvest opportunities were expanded to maintain deer populations at homeowner-desired herd levels, while satisfying the desires of the growing number of urban hunters.

Youth Hunting: Youth-only portions of deer, turkey and waterfowl hunting seasons not only preserve family values related to hunting traditions, but create opportunities for youth to develop strong personal connections to nature.

What the Money Bought – Fiscal Year 2005

County Assistance Payments—$1,339,405 Includes payments to Missouri’s 114 counties for levee and drainage district taxes, forest cropland payments, payments in lieu of real estate taxes and county aid road trust payments. The five largest payments were to Shannon ($104,514), St. Louis ($52,529), Howard ($48,215), Lincoln ($43,618), and Holt ($38,656) counties.

Fisheries—$11,278,187 Managed 897 lakes and 40 stream management areas for public fishing. Over 840,000 people bought fishing permits making fishing one of the most popular outdoor activities in Missouri. Fish hatcheries produced about 8.4 million fish, stocking many farm ponds, reservoirs and streams.

Forestry—$14,987,545 Fostered a healthy and growing forest resource. Examples include distributing 5 million seedlings for planting to nearly 13,000 landowners, developing 180 Landowner Forest Stewardship Plans, bringing an additional 29,000 acres under total resource management, managing 438,700 acres of public forest land, monitoring insect and disease threats, and facilitating development of the state’s forest industry.

Wildlife—$15,106,140 Worked towards ensuring wildlife populations that are in harmony with habitat and human enjoyment. Managed 513,776 acres of public land and conducted programs to monitor game and non-game species, develop wetlands and restore wildlife.

Resource Science—$11,669,901 Provided the science-based information needed to effectively manage Missouri’s natural resources. Resource Science monitors the status of Missouri’s forests, fish, and wildlife, recommends conservation actions, evaluates these actions, and reports the results. In addition to surveys of fish and wildlife, more than 200,000 Missourians were contacted to determine their outdoor activities and opinions about conservation programs.

Protection—$13,470,876 Paid for law enforcement in every county as well as resource management, information, education and public service contact activities conducted by 167 conservation agents who directly contacted 513,792 people. A joint investigation with Iowa resulted in over 200 citations and in excess of $36,000 in fines to individuals who unlawfully bought resident permits in both states. Conservation agents, along with 2,200 volunteer instructors conducted 1,072 hunter education classes, certifying 20,046 students.

Outreach and Education—$16,092,745 Sustained and nourished Missourians’ connection to the outdoors by providing educational materials, schoolteacher contacts, outdoor skills programs, the Missouri Conservationist magazine, TV show, books, videos, informational programs, staffed shooting ranges and conservation nature centers.

Private Land Services—$6,766,496 Helped private landowners to achieve long-term conservation of natural resources and their land-use objectives. Delivered over $1.1 million in cost-share funds to approximately 850 private landowners; provided on-site technical assistance to over 6,000 private landowners; improved habitat for quail and grassland songbirds on over 10,700 acres of private land; helped landowners enroll almost 6,800 acres into the Wetland Reserve Program; and assisted almost 5,300 private landowners in controlling nuisance wildlife.

Administration—$2,350,815 Paid for audits, legal counsel, planning, environmental coordination, local government assistance, summer help and general expenses and equipment.

Administrative Services and Human Resources—$27,243,693 Paid for human resources, federal reimbursement administration, hunting and fishing permit point-of-sale system, fiscal services, distribution center, print shop, fleet management, vehicle and equipment maintenance centers, and information management and technology. Also includes other agency appropriations, Department-wide equipment and other essential services.

Construction and Development—$16,242,558 Work included fish hatchery improvements, development of nature centers, river accesses, wetlands, shooting ranges and renovation and repair of facilities statewide.

Design and Development—$11,082,357 Paid for building and grounds maintenance, engineering and architectural services.

County Assistance Payments—$1,339,405 Includes payments to Missouri’s 114 counties for levee and drainage district taxes, forest cropland payments, payments in lieu of real estate taxes and county aid road trust payments. The five largest payments were to Shannon ($104,514), St. Louis ($52,529), Howard ($48,215), Lincoln ($43,618), and Holt ($38,656) counties.

Fisheries—$11,278,187 Managed 897 lakes and 40 stream management areas for public fishing. Over 840,000 people bought fishing permits making fishing one of the most popular outdoor activities in Missouri. Fish hatcheries produced about 8.4 million fish, stocking many farm ponds, reservoirs and streams.

Forestry—$14,987,545 Fostered a healthy and growing forest resource. Examples include distributing 5 million seedlings for planting to nearly 13,000 landowners, developing 180 Landowner Forest Stewardship Plans, bringing an additional 29,000 acres under total resource management, managing 438,700 acres of public forest land, monitoring insect and disease threats, and facilitating development of the state’s forest industry.

Wildlife—$15,106,140 Worked towards ensuring wildlife populations that are in harmony with habitat and human enjoyment. Managed 513,776 acres of public land and conducted programs to monitor game and non-game species, develop wetlands and restore wildlife.

Resource Science—$11,669,901 Provided the science-based information needed to effectively manage Missouri’s natural resources. Resource Science monitors the status of Missouri’s forests, fish, and wildlife, recommends conservation actions, evaluates these actions, and reports the results. In addition to surveys of fish and wildlife, more than 200,000 Missourians were contacted to determine their outdoor activities and opinions about conservation programs.

Protection—$13,470,876 Paid for law enforcement in every county as well as resource management, information, education and public service contact activities conducted by 167 conservation agents who directly contacted 513,792 people. A joint investigation with Iowa resulted in over 200 citations and in excess of $36,000 in fines to individuals who unlawfully bought resident permits in both states. Conservation agents, along with 2,200 volunteer instructors conducted 1,072 hunter education classes, certifying 20,046 students.

Outreach and Education—$16,092,745 Sustained and nourished Missourians’ connection to the outdoors by providing educational materials, schoolteacher contacts, outdoor skills programs, the Missouri Conservationist magazine, TV show, books, videos, informational programs, staffed shooting ranges and conservation nature centers.

Private Land Services—$6,766,496 Helped private landowners to achieve long-term conservation of natural resources and their land-use objectives. Delivered over $1.1 million in cost-share funds to approximately 850 private landowners; provided on-site technical assistance to over 6,000 private landowners; improved habitat for quail and grassland songbirds on over 10,700 acres of private land; helped landowners enroll almost 6,800 acres into the Wetland Reserve Program; and assisted almost 5,300 private landowners in controlling nuisance wildlife.

Administration—$2,350,815 Paid for audits, legal counsel, planning, environmental coordination, local government assistance, summer help and general expenses and equipment.

Administrative Services and Human Resources—$27,243,693 Paid for human resources, federal reimbursement administration, hunting and fishing permit point-of-sale system, fiscal services, distribution center, print shop, fleet management, vehicle and equipment maintenance centers, and information management and technology. Also includes other agency appropriations, Department-wide equipment and other essential services.

Construction and Development—$16,242,558 Work included fish hatchery improvements, development of nature centers, river accesses, wetlands, shooting ranges and renovation and repair of facilities statewide.

Design and Development—$11,082,357 Paid for building and grounds maintenance, engineering and architectural services.

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