From the Missouri Conservationist Magazine
May 1999 Issue

Back Cover

geocarpon

Geocarpon (Geocarpon mininum)

One of the world's rarest plants, geocarpon grows only in western Missouri and at a few sites in Arkansas and Louisiana. Because it is only one and one half inches tall and has inconspicuous flowers with no petals, geocarpon is seldom noticed except by careful observers. It survives on sandstone bedrock in pockets of pebbly sand that are too shallow for most other plants to live. Geocarpon flowers in early spring, when glades are typically wet, completing its life cycle before the habitat becomes desert-like and hostile to plant growth. The Conservation Department is helping to protect sandstone glades where geocarpon

Also in this issue

Nature's Tiny Teachers

The smallest of creatures can teach us plenty about life and survival.

Living on the Edge

A lawnmower lesson: We share our space with lots of creatures.

The Lure of Missouri Trout

Hundreds of miles of trout water cater to anglers of all types.

Sand County Anniversary

When people pick up a copy of A Sand County Almanac, they usually connect the famous author and environmentalist with Wisconsin, where his family acquired a "shack" on a worn-out farm, and where he was employed as a university professor and served on the conservation commission. -- The famous environmentalist and author of A Sand County Almanac had close ties to the Show-Me state.

Missouri Copperheads

They are vital to the natural scene, they rarely bite, they never kill.

This Issue's Staff:

Editor - Tom Cwynar
Assistant Editor - Charlotte Overby
Managing Editor - Jim Auckley
Art Editor - Dickson Stauffer
Designer - Tracy Ritter
Artist - Dave Besenger
Artist - Mark Raithel
Photographer - Jim Rathert
Photographer - Cliff White
Staff Writer - Jim Low
Staff Writer - Joan McKee
Composition - Libby Bode Block
Circulation - Bertha Bainer