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Content tagged with "Spring"

Comparison of the 2011 flood event

You might ask, “So how did this year’s event compare to other flood events?” Well, I dug up some information to try and put things in perspective. The average rainfall in April and May is 9.5 inches. This, of course, varies from year to year. Surprisingly, last spring was average (we received 9.36 inches), but after that the bottom dropped out and we spent the rest of the year in a serious drought…which, by the way, I think it is safe to say we are out of the woods.

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Photo of compass plant leaves

Compass Plant (Leaves)

The leaves of compass plant are hairy and deeply cleft almost to the midrib, the lobes sometimes having secondary divisions. In full sun, the upright lower leaves turn their edges toward north and south, with the flat surfaces facing east and west, giving compass plant its common name.

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A photo of a cottonmouth snake in defensive posture.

Cottonmouth snake in defensive posture

A photo of a cottonmouth snake in defensive posture.

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A photo of a cottonmouth snake in defensive posture.

Cottonmouth snake in defensive posture

A cottonmouth gapes its mouth open in a defensive posture, showing the white lining that is the origin of the common name.

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Photo of a cottonmouth snake in defensive posture.

Cottonmouth snake in defensive posture

A cottonmouth gapes its mouth open in a defensive posture, showing the white lining that is the origin of the common name.

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Cottonmouth snake

Cottonmouth snake in defensive posture

A cottonmouth gapes its mouth open in a defensive posture, showing the white lining that is the origin of the common name.

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Counting Missouri Turkey Gobbles for Fun and a Prize

Looking for an excuse to listen to the sounds of spring this year?

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Image of a white crappie

Crappie by the Numbers

This content is archived
Fishing skill + technical savvy = fishing and eating enjoyment.

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Crayfish Recipes

The "freshwater lobsters" of Missouri streams have as much flavor and nutrition as their sea-going cousins.

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