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Content tagged with "Technical Series"

Effect of Eastern Red Cedar Brush on nest Abundance and Survival of Age-0 Black Bass in Bull Shoals Lake, Missouri

Technical Series Vol. 4 Recruitment of black bass Micropterus spp. in large reservoirs is often related to fluctuations in water levels, although the specific mechanism driving recruitment is not known. Eastern red cedar Juniperus virginiana brush was added to coves within Bull Shoals Lake to replicate habitat conditions present during high water events in an effort to increase numbers of nesting adult black bass and abundance of age-0 black bass.

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Experimental Back-sloping with Vegetation Establishment as an Erosion Control Option for Missouri Streambanks

Technical Series Vol. 5 Missouri landowners dealing with streambank erosion problems are searching for affordable and effective techniques they can use to address existing erosion issues and protect their property from further erosion. The search is complicated because the eroding streambank is often a symptom of a larger problem occurring elsewhere within the watershed. Consequently, finding an effective erosion control method can be difficult for a landowner unless they receive appropriate professional assistance. The limitations of currently available methods in terms of high cost, difficult installation, or inapplicability to larger stream systems have caused landowners to try techniques that are ineffective and may lead to increased instability. As a result, the Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) decided to evaluate five different streambank stabilization techniques. The back-sloping with vegetation establishment approach was evaluated as a potential alternative to a longitudinal rip rap toe project for controlling excessive streambank erosion. The back-sloping approach is designed to reduce erosive forces acting on the eroding streambank by back-sloping the streambank which gives it a higher width to depth ratio and establishing vegetation that will decrease velocities by adding roughness and stabilize the streambank with root systems over the long-term. Five back-sloping with vegetation establishment projects were distributed among five streams located on four MDC conservation areas across Missouri. The projects were built between September 2006 and January 2009 and all experienced multiple high flow events.

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Experimental Farm Rock Toe Protection as an Erosion Control Option for Missouri Streambanks

Technical Series Vol. 9 Missouri landowners dealing with streambank erosion problems are searching for affordable and effective techniques that they can use to address existing erosion issues and protect their property from further erosion. This search is complicated because the eroding streambank is often a symptom of a larger problem occurring elsewhere within the watershed. Consequently, finding an effective erosion control method can be difficult for a landowner unless they receive appropriate professional assistance. The limitations of currently available methods in terms of high cost, difficult installation, or inapplicability to larger stream systems have caused landowners to try techniques that are ineffective and may lead to increased instability. As a result, the Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) decided to evaluate five different streambank stabilization techniques. Farm rock toe was evaluated as a potential low cost alternative to a traditional longitudinal rip rap toe project for controlling excessive streambank erosion. The differences between farm rock toe and a traditional longitudinal rip rap toe protection approach are four fold: 1) farm rock toe is made from shot rock (quarry rock not graded out to a specific size) instead of graded out rip rap, 2) farm rock toe is not keyed into the bed of the stream, 3) farm rock toe is not keyed into the streambank at the upper and lower end of the project, and 4) instead of placing each rock, the rock is dumped from the top of the streambank and then adjusted as necessary to fill in gaps. These changes were made to reduce the cost of a rock toe protection approach while hopefully still stabilizing the bank.

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Experimental Farm Rock Weirs as an Erosion Control Option for Missouri Streambanks

Technical Series Vol. 8 Missouri landowners dealing with streambank erosion problems are searching for affordable and effec-tive techniques that they can use to address existing erosion issues and protect their property from further ero-sion. This search is complicated because the eroding streambank is often a symptom of a larger problem oc-curring elsewhere within the watershed. Consequently, finding an effective erosion control method can be dif-ficult for a landowner unless they receive appropriate professional assistance. The limitations of currently available methods in terms of high cost, difficult installation, or inapplicability to larger stream systems have caused landowners to try techniques that are ineffective and may lead to increased instability. As a result, the Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) decided to evaluate farm rock weirs as a potential low cost alternative to a bendway weir project for controlling excessive streambank erosion. The difference between farm rock weirs and traditional bendway weirs are three fold: 1) farm rock weirs are made from shot rock (quarry rock not graded out to a specific size) instead of graded out rip rap, 2) farm rock weirs are not keyed into the bed of the stream, and 3) farm rock weirs are not keyed into the bank. These changes were made to reduce the costs associated with a weir approach while hopefully still stabilizing the bank.

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Experimental Gravel-rolls with Back-sloping and Vegetation Establishment as an Erosion Control Option for Missouri Streams

Technical Series Vol. 6 Missouri landowners dealing with streambank erosion problems are searching for affordable and effective techniques they can use to address existing erosion issues and protect their property from further erosion. The search is complicated because the eroding streambank is often a symptom of a larger problem occurring elsewhere within the watershed. Consequently, finding an effective erosion control method can be difficult for a landowner unless they receive appropriate professional assistance. The limitations of currently available methods in terms of high cost, difficult installation, or inapplicability to larger stream systems have caused landowners to try techniques that are ineffective and may lead to increased instability. As a result, the Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) decided to evaluate the use of a gravel-roll with back-sloping and vegetation establishment as a potential technique for controlling excessive stream-bank erosion. The gravel-roll approach is designed to reduce erosive forces acting on the eroding streambank by back-sloping the streambank which gives it a higher width-to-depth ratio, and establishing vegetation that will decrease velocities by adding roughness and stabilize the streambank with root systems over the long-term. In addition, a gravel-roll is built at the toe, which is intended to protect the streambank toe in the short-term, allowing vegetation to stabilize the streambank over the long-term.

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Experimental Log Weirs as an Erosion Control Option for Missouri Streambanks

Technical Series Vol. 7 Missouri landowners dealing with streambank erosion problems are searching for affordable and effec-tive techniques that they can use to address existing erosion issues and protect their property from further erosion. This search is complicated because the eroding streambank is often a symptom of a larger problem occurring elsewhere within the watershed. Consequently, finding an effective erosion control method can be difficult for a landowner unless they receive appropriate professional assistance. The limitations of currently available methods in terms of high cost, difficult installation, or inapplicability to larger stream systems have caused landowners to try techniques that are ineffective and may lead to increased instability. As a result, the Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) decided to evaluate log weirs as a potential technique for controlling excessive streambank erosion. The goal of the log weir technique is to save money over the traditional bendway weir approach by using logs as opposed to using large amounts of rip rap to build the traditional rock weirs. This reduces the costs associated with a weir approach while attempting to stabilize the streambank.

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Growth and Mortality of Pin Oak and Pecan Reforestation in a Constructed Wetland: Analysis with Management Implications

Technical Series Vol. 1 Pin oak (Quercus palustris Muenchh.) and pecan (Carya illinoensis (Wangenh.) K. Koch) trees were planted on reforestation plots at Four Rivers Conservation Area in west-central Missouri. The study was conducted to determine survival and growth rates of the two species under different production methods and environmental variables. Production methods included direct seeding, bare root seedlings, and RPM® planting stock. Combi-nations of planting stock and species were implemented on two elevations (mounded or unmounded soils).

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Landowner Attitudes Toward Shortleaf Pine Restoration

Technical Series Vol. 2 There is considerable interest in restoring shortleaf pine by various agencies and private land-owners in Missouri. Given that 85% of commercial forests in the state are under private ownership, restoration efforts are not possible without the participation of private landowners. In preparation to assist private landown-ers with shortleaf pine restoration, an understanding of their interest, attitudes and motivations toward restora-tion and general forest management is necessary. The specific objectives of this study were to: Determine the characteristics of landowners in the shortleaf pine range and the extent to which they are planting and managing shortleaf pine. Identify landowner reasons for restoring shortleaf pine on their land. Identify landowner challenges to shortleaf pine restoration.

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Movement and Survival of Black River Strain Walleye <i>Sander vitreus</i> in Southern Missouri Rivers

Technical Series Vol. 3 Limited research has been conducted on Black River strain (BRS) walleye Sander vitreus that occur in south-eastern Missouri rivers. In an effort to provide additional insight on stocking contribution to existing stocks and movement of juvenile and adult walleye in these systems, multiple evaluations were conducted examining stocking mortality, juvenile movement using biotelemetry, adult movement and exploitation using reward tags, and stocking contribution using chemically marked otoliths.

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