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Content tagged with "Ozark"

Photo of a bristly cave crayfish, viewed from the side.

Bristly Cave Crayfish

The bristly cave crayfish is a whitish crayfish with small, unpigmented eyes and long, slender pincers with noticeable setae (bristles). It lives in caves in the Springfield Plateau region of the Ozarks.

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Photo of a bristly cave crayfish, closeup of top of head.

Bristly Cave Crayfish

On the bristly cave crayfish, the rostrum (triangular area at the front of the head) has a central, troughlike depression, and its margins narrow rather abruptly into a rather short tip, and not a long, slender point.

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Photo of a bristly cave crayfish, from above, on a gravel substrate.

Bristly Cave Crayfish

One of at least three species of cave crayfish in Missouri, the bristly cave crayfish has been collected from areas of complete darkness as well as from the twilight zone of caves, from the outflow of springs, and from shallow wells exposed to daylight.

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Photo of a bristly cave crayfish, viewed from front.

Bristly Cave Crayfish

The bristles on the bristly cave crayfish enhance its sense of touch in the complete dark of caves. Crayfish eat a variety of materials, including living and dead animal life, and this cave crayfish undoubtedly feeds on cave isopods and other animals that live in the streams of caves. Crayfish, living or dead, are in turn an important food for many other animals.

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Photo of a bristly cave crayfish, from above, on a silty substrate.

Bristly Cave Crayfish

The bristly cave crayfish has found on substrates of sand and silt; also on scattered rock and near bat-guano piles.

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Photo of a bristly cave crayfish, from above, on a gravel substrate.

Bristly Cave Crayfish

The bristly cave crayfish occurs in nine counties in southwestern Missouri’s Springfield Plateau section of the Ozarks, where it has been found three major stream systems: Neosho (Elk and Spring), White, and Missouri (Osage). It has also been found in extreme northeastern Oklahoma.

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Photo of a bristly cave crayfish, closeup showing bristles on pincers.

Bristly Cave Crayfish Pincers

The bristly cave crayfish is named for the noticeable setae (bristles) on its pincers, which help distinguish it from other cave crayfish.

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Photo of Broad-headed skink on ground among leaves

Broad-Headed Skink

Plestiodon laticeps
The broad-headed skink is a large, harmless, smooth-scaled lizard that lives along the edge of forests and woodlots. It often makes its home in a large dead tree, sometimes using abandoned woodpecker holes or other cavities.

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Photo of Broad-headed skink on ground among leaves

Broad-Headed Skink

This large, harmless, smooth-scaled lizard lives along the edge of forests and woodlots. It often makes its home in a large dead tree, sometimes using abandoned woodpecker holes or other cavities.

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Broadsides from the Ozarks

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Sue Hubbell left her job as a librarian at an eastern university and found life in the Ozarks with 300 hives of bees and a newspaper column.

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