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Content tagged with "Northeast"

Image of a false map turtle

False Map Turtle

Graptemys pseudogeographica pseudogeographica
The false map turtle is a medium-sized aquatic species with a low ridge along the center of the upper shell. A thick yellow line behind each eye forms a backward L shape. It occurs in large rivers and reservoirs in central, northeastern, northwestern, and southeastern Missouri.

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fatmucket

Fatmucket

Lampsilis siliquoidea
The fatmucket was a favorite species harvested for the button industry in the early 1900s.

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Photo of a four-toed salamander on a mossy rock.

Four-Toed Salamander

Hemidactylium scutatum
A glacial relict in Missouri’s eastern Ozarks, the four-toed salamander lives among mosses in heavily forested streams and creeks and sinkhole ponds. In the northern part of its range, this salamander lives in peat bogs.

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Image of fowler's toad

Fowler’s Toad

Anaxyrus fowleri
Fowler’s toad is the common toad of gravel and sand bars along Ozark streams and rivers as well of the Mississippi Lowlands. It usually has paired dark markings with 3 or more warts, and usually has a light tan or white line down the back as well as a dark gray spot on the chest.

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Photo of Fremont’s leather flower

Fremont’s Leather Flower

Clematis fremontii
The only non-climbing clematis in the state, Fremont’s leather flower is a shrubby perennial with bell-shaped flowers. It grows on open glades in the eastern part of Missouri and in southwestern Missouri’s Ozark County.

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French Grass

Orbexilum onobrychis (formerly Psoralea onobrychis)
Looking absolutely nothing like a grass, French grass, a legume, bears upright spikes of pale purple flowers on long stems from the leaf axils. The leaves are trifoliate, resembling those of soybeans.

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Photo of glade coneflower flowerhead showing yellow pollen

Glade Coneflower

Echinacea simulata
One of Missouri’s five types of echinacea, glade coneflower is distinguished by its yellow pollen, drooping pink or purple ray flowers, and narrow, tapering leaves. Look for it in the eastern Ozarks, and at native plant nurseries!

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Photo of goat's beard plant with flower clusters

Goat’s Beard

Aruncus dioicus
Goat’s beard is named for its bold, branching, plumelike clusters of flowers. Look for it growing in rich soils in low woods and north-facing slopes, bases of bluffs, and other moist places in the southeastern half of our state.

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Image of a golden crayfish

Golden Crayfish

Orconectes luteus
This wide-ranging species is quite variable in color, but it is typically olive-green suffused with golden yellow. The antennae and many body parts are trimmed with bright red. A dark band crosses the head just in front of the cervical groove, and another crosses the carapace at its junction with the abdomen.

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Image of a golden redhorse fish

Golden Redhorse

Moxostoma erythrurum
The golden redhorse is a smaller-bodied sucker with large scales and a short dorsal fin. The lower lip is broken into parallel folds, and the rear margin of the lower lip forms a V-shaped angle.

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