Content tagged with "woody vine"

Prairie Rose (Climbing Rose)

Photo of prairie rose blossom closeup showing pink petals and man yellow stamens
Rosa setigera
“Climbing rose” is the better of the two common names for this native shrub or woody vine: It is most common near woodlands, where it climbs and trails on neighboring shrubs and small trees. More

Trees, Shrubs, and Vines

Learn about Missouri's trees, shrubs, and woody vines. More

Trumpet Creeper (Flowers)

Photo of trumpet creeper showing cluster of flowers
Each summer, the bright orange and red “trumpets” of this woody vine decorate Missouri’s cliff faces, telephone poles, and anything else strong enough to support it. Hummingbirds zoom to trumpet creeper’s flowers for their nectar. More

Trumpet Creeper (Trumpet Vine)

Photo of trumpet creeper flower with compound leaf arching nearby.
The flowers of trumpet vine are favored by hummingbirds, which cross-pollinate the flowers as they forage. The North American range of trumpet creeper nearly matches that of the ruby-throated hummingbird. It is often cultivated as an ornamental vine, but because of its aggressive growth, it is best suited for areas where it will not overwhelm other plants. It requires a strong support. More

Trumpet Creeper (Trumpet Vine)

Photo of trumpet creeper showing cluster of flowers
Campsis radicans
Each summer, the bright orange and red “trumpets” of this woody vine decorate Missouri’s cliff faces, telephone poles, and anything else strong enough to support it. Hummingbirds zoom to trumpet creeper’s flowers for their nectar. More

Virginia Creeper

Image of Virginia creeper leaves
Parthenocissus quinquefolia
Occasionally confused with poison ivy, Virginia creeper can be easily identified by simply noticing that most of its leaflets are in fives, instead of threes. This delightful native vine is useful in landscaping. More

Yellow Honeysuckle

Photo of yellow honeysuckle vine showing leaves and flowers
Lonicera flava
One of our beautiful, native Missouri honeysuckles, yellow honeysuckle grows mainly in the Ozarks. Unlike the invasive Japanese honeysuckle, this plant is not aggressive and makes a wonderful trellis vine for the ecology-minded gardener. More

Yellow Honeysuckle

Photo of yellow honeysuckle vine showing leaves and flowers
One of our beautiful, native Missouri honeysuckles, yellow honeysuckle grows mainly in the Ozarks but can be grown as a wonderful trellis vine statewide. Pay attention to the platterlike pair of joined leaves beneath the flower clusters: The invasive exotic Japanese honeysuckle has no such united leaves. More