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Content tagged with "woody vine"

Photo of dewberry flowers

Dewberry

Dewberry is a lot like common blackberry, except that instead of being a small shrub, its canes form trailing woody vines. Both plants are prickly, and both produce delicious deep purple berries!

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Photo of dewberry flowers

Dewberry

Rubus flagellaris
Dewberry is a lot like common blackberry, except that instead of being a small shrub, its canes form trailing woody vines. Both plants are prickly, and both produce delicious deep purple berries!

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Grape Honeysuckle

Lonicera reticulata (formerly L. prolifera)
One of Missouri's beautiful native honeysuckles, grape honeysuckle is found mainly in the northern two-thirds of the state. In the native plant garden, it is easy to grow, but it is not aggressive like the introduced invasive Japanese honeysuckle.

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Photo of a huge mass of kudzu vines covering trees and ground

Kudzu

Of the many invasive exotic plants that were originally introduced to stop soil erosion and improve soils, kudzu is one of the worst. This “vine that ate the South” is often the first plant that comes to mind when we think of “invasive exotics.”

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Photo of a huge mass of kudzu vines covering trees and ground

Kudzu

Pueraria montana
Of the many invasive exotic plants that were originally introduced to stop soil erosion and improve soils, kudzu is one of the worst. This “vine that ate the South” is often the first plant that comes to mind when we think of “invasive exotics.”

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Photo of limber honeysuckle flowers

Limber Honeysuckle (Flowers)

Identify our native limber honeysuckle by its crowded clusters of tubular, yellow or greenish-yellow flowers, tinged with red, purple, or pink, that are noticeably enlarged on one side at the base.

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Photo of limber honeysuckle fruits

Limber Honeysuckle (Fruits)

The leaves of limber honeysuckle are opposite and simple, with the upper pair just below the flowers united to form a disk that is longer than broad; the leaves below the disk are not united. The berries are orange-red to red when mature.

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Photo of limber honeysuckle flowers

Limber Honeysuckle (Wild Honeysuckle; Red Honeysuckle)

Lonicera dioica
This native Missouri honeysuckle is uncommon and widely scattered in the state, but it does well as a trellis vine in the native landscape garden. Identify it by its crowded clusters of tubular, yellow or greenish-yellow flowers, tinged with red, purple, or pink, that are noticeably enlarged on one side at the base.

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Image of poison ivy

Poison Ivy

Toxicodentron radicans
This toxic plant contains an oil in all its parts that, if you come into contact with it, can cause an intense skin reaction. This is no reason to stay indoors, however! Learn to recognize poison ivy, and sidestep it on your outings.

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Photo of prairie rose blossom closeup showing pink petals and man yellow stamens

Prairie Rose (Climbing Rose)

“Climbing rose” is the better of the two common names for this native shrub or woody vine: It is most common near woodlands, where it climbs and trails on neighboring shrubs and small trees.

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