Content tagged with "wild edible"

Johnny-Jump-Up (Field Pansy)

Image of Johnny-jump-up.
Viola bicolor
It's not our largest violet, but it's one of the most common. The coloration of these delicate-looking flowers often looks faded. Look for it in fields, meadows, glades, rights-of-way, disturbed sites and possibly your front lawn. More

Letters

This content is archived
"Letters" for the December 2011 Missouri Conservationist. More

Mayapple (Mandrake)

Photo of mayapple colony looking like numerous green umbrellas on forest floor
Podophyllum peltatum
Often growing in colonies, mayapple is a common spring wildflower that makes its biggest impression with its leaves, which resemble umbrellas arising from a single stalk. The whitish, waxy flowers form beneath the leaves, at the axil where the stalk splits into leaves. More

Mayapple (Mandrake) (Colony)

Photo of mayapple colony looking like numerous green umbrellas on forest floor
Often growing in colonies, mayapple is a common spring wildflower that makes its biggest impression with its leaves, which resemble umbrellas arising from a single stalk. More

Mayapple (Mandrake) (Flower)

Photo of a mayapple flower with foliage above
The whitish, waxy flowers of mayapple form beneath the leaves, at the axil where the stalk splits into leaves. Plants with only 1 leaf will not flower or fruit; only plants with 2 or 3 leaves can form flowers and fruits. More

Midwestern Arrowhead (Duck Potato; Wapato)

Photo of midwestern arrowhead male flowers and buds.
Sagittaria brevirostra
An attractive aquatic plant with erect, arrow-shaped leaves and distinctive flowers, Midwestern arrowhead is often called duck potato because ducks, geese, and swans relish the tuberlike rootstocks. More

Midwestern Arrowhead (Male Flowers)

Photo of midwestern arrowhead male flowers and buds.
Flowers of Midwestern arrowhead arise in whorls of 2 or 3. The flowers on the lowest part of the flowering stalk are female and are not showy. The male flowers (pictured) grow higher on the stalks. They are showy, with 3 white petals and many yellow stamens. More

Midwestern Arrowhead Plants

Photo of midwestern arrowhead plants with pond surface in background.
The leaves of many arrowhead species typically have arrowhead-shaped leaves. The genus name, Sagittaria, refers to these sagittate leaves and shares its Latin linguistic root with the constellation Sagittarius, the archer. More