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Content tagged with "wild edible"

Index to Edible Uses

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Edible use index.

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Index to Plants

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Plant index.

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Photo of Jack-in-the-pulpit plant showing foliage and flowering structure

Jack-in-the-Pulpit

Arisaema triphyllum
Preacher Jack in his “pulpit” is sheltered by the canopylike spathe, which is green with white and brown lengthwise markings. An unforgettable spring wildflower, Jack-in-the-pulpit is common throughout the state.

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Photo of Jack-in-the-pulpit plant showing foliage and flowering structure

Jack-in-the-Pulpit

Preacher Jack in his “pulpit” is sheltered by the canopylike spathe, which is green with white and brown lengthwise markings. An unforgettable spring wildflower, Jack-in-the-pulpit is common throughout the state.

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Photo of Jack-in-the-pulpit ripe red fruit cluster

Jack-In-The-Pulpit (Fruits)

Jack-in-the-pulpit fruits are clustered berries that turn from shiny green to brilliant scarlet. The foliage usually has withered away by the time the fruits ripen, and without leaves, they are indistinguishable from those of the closely related green dragon.

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Photo of the upper portions of two Jerusalem artichoke plants.

Jerusalem Artichoke

Jerusalem artichoke is a tall native sunflower with edible tubers and great crop potential, but it has never been very big commercially. Fortunately, we can enjoy it for free in nature.

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Photo of a Jerusalem artichoke flowerhead, with leaves in the background.

Jerusalem Artichoke

The flowerheads of Jerusalem artichoke are about 3 inches across, with 12–20 ray florets. They frequently have a distinct chocolate scent. It blooms August–October.

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Photo of a Jerusalem artichoke flowerhead with a black background.

Jerusalem Artichoke

Jerusalem artichoke deserves a better common name. It is not from Jerusalem, nor is it an artichoke. It is a Missouri native sunflower that grows in moist areas of prairies, waste places, and roadsides.

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Photo of uprooted Jerusalem artichoke plant showing tubers at rhizome tips.

Jerusalem Artichoke (Roots with Tubers)

The crisp, fleshy tubers of Jerusalem artichoke are edible and taste something like nuts and artichokes. They can be eaten raw, cooked, or pickled. Native Americans cultivated the plant, and it was a fashionable food in Europe in the 1600s.

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Photo of a Jerusalem artichoke stem showing bases of two opposite leaves.

Jerusalem Artichoke (Stem with Leaf Bases)

Jerusalem artichoke is perhaps best identified by its leaves, which are mostly opposite, but alternate in the upper third of the plant; also that the leaves are long, lanceolate, 3-veined, coarsely toothed, long-tapered at the base with winged petioles, and rough-hairy above, downy below.

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