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Content tagged with "wild edible"

Image of a hackberry leaf

Hackberry

Celtis occidentalis
Although it's named for its sweet, purple (edible) fruits, most people learn to identify hackberry because of its interesting bark, which develops numerous corky, wartlike projections that sometimes join to form ridges.

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Photo of hawthorn trees blooming on lawn of Missouri state capitol

Hawthorns

Our state flower, the hawthorn, is solidly represented in Missouri. There are about 100 different kinds of hawthorns that occupy almost every kind of soil in every part of the state. Member of the rose family, hawthorns are closely related to apples.

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Photo of hawthorn trees blooming on lawn of Missouri state capitol

Hawthorns

Various species in the genus Crataegus
Our state flower, the hawthorn, is solidly represented in Missouri. There are about 100 different kinds of hawthorns that occupy almost every kind of soil in every part of the state. Member of the rose family, hawthorns are closely related to apples.

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Photo of henbit plants with flowers

Henbit

Lamium amplexicaule
Henbit always draws attention in early spring when it blasts entire fields with the pinkish-purple of its flowers. A non-native weed that spreads abundantly, it causes few problems because it has shallow roots and fades before crops begin to grow.

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Photo of henbit plants with flowers

Henbit

Henbit always draws attention in early spring when it blasts entire fields with the pinkish-purple of its flowers. A non-native weed that spreads abundantly, it causes few problems because it has shallow roots and fades before crops begin to grow.

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In Search of Wild Raspberries

Last weekend was the perfect time to stroll along the edge of the woods for two reasons.

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Index to Edible Uses

pdf (355.8 K)
Edible use index.

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Index to Plants

pdf (285.5 K)
Plant index.

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Photo of Jack-in-the-pulpit plant showing foliage and flowering structure

Jack-in-the-Pulpit

Preacher Jack in his “pulpit” is sheltered by the canopylike spathe, which is green with white and brown lengthwise markings. An unforgettable spring wildflower, Jack-in-the-pulpit is common throughout the state.

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Photo of Jack-in-the-pulpit plant showing foliage and flowering structure

Jack-in-the-Pulpit

Arisaema triphyllum
Preacher Jack in his “pulpit” is sheltered by the canopylike spathe, which is green with white and brown lengthwise markings. An unforgettable spring wildflower, Jack-in-the-pulpit is common throughout the state.

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