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Content tagged with "wild edible"

Photo of common ground cherry spent flower with immature fruit

Common Ground Cherry (Spent Flower With Immature Fruit)

There are 13 Physalis species recorded for Missouri. All share the characteristic balloonlike, papery husk around the berry, which is why these plants are called “husk tomatoes.”

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Photo of corn salad plant flower clusters showing arrangement of buds.

Corn Salad

The flowers of corn salad are minute and form in a fascinating platform-like cluster. Each flower is funnel-shaped, with 5 white lobes. It blooms April–May. This plant was growing in a prairie in Benton County, but corn salad grows in many other types of open habitat, too.

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Photo of corn salad plant flower clusters showing arrangement of buds.

Corn Salad

Valerianella radiata
At first glance, you might overlook corn salad, except for the large colonies it often forms. The young leaves can be eaten as a salad green, hence the name.

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Photo of corn salad plants with flowers

Corn Salad

At first glance, you might overlook corn salad, except for the large colonies it often forms. The young leaves can be eaten as a salad green, hence the name.

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Illustration of dewberry leaves, flowers, fruits.

Dewberry

Dewberry, Rubus flagellaris.

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Photo of dewberry flowers

Dewberry

Rubus flagellaris
Dewberry is a lot like common blackberry, except that instead of being a small shrub, its canes form trailing woody vines. Both plants are prickly, and both produce delicious deep purple berries!

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Photo of dewberry flowers

Dewberry

Dewberry is a lot like common blackberry, except that instead of being a small shrub, its canes form trailing woody vines. Both plants are prickly, and both produce delicious deep purple berries!

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Photo of eastern prickly pear plant with flowers

Eastern Prickly Pear

Cacti make us think of the desert southwest, but there is at least one species native to Missouri. This prickly pear grows in glades, sand prairies, rocky open hillsides, and other dry, sun-soaked areas.

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Photo of eastern prickly pear flowers

Eastern Prickly Pear

The flowers of eastern prickly pear are numerous, yellow, with many similar-looking sepals and petals, the innermost often with an orange splotch, to 3 inches across, with many stamens. It blooms May–July.

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Photo of eastern prickly pear plant with flowers

Eastern Prickly Pear

Eastern prickly pear is scattered throughout Missouri. It grows in sunny, dry places: rocky areas of upland prairies, sand prairies, glades, tops and exposed ledges of bluffs, and rocky stream terraces; also pastures, roadsides, railroads, and open, disturbed areas.

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