Content tagged with "wild edible"

Common Dayflower (Asiatic Dayflower)

Photo of common dayflower flower and buds.
Commelina communis
The flowers of dayflower are truly blue, and they have only two conspicuous petals. A fast-growing, sprawling, but shallow-rooted weed, this introduced species commonly annoys gardeners. More

Common Ground Cherry (Flower)

Photo of common ground cherry flower
The flowers of ground cherry typically hang downward like bells. They arise singly from the leaf axils and are about 1 inch long, sulphur to lemon yellow, with the inner surface with 5 purplish spots or smudges toward the base that are sometimes merged into a ring. It blooms May–September. More

Common Ground Cherry (Fruit With Husk Partly Removed)

Photo of common ground cherry fruit with husk partially removed
Ground cherry is closely related to tomatillo; they are in the same genus, and both have edible berries covered by a papery husk. The tart berries start out green, turn yellow, and fall to the ground. Discard the husks and make jam, jelly, or pie, or eat the berries fresh. More

Common Ground Cherry (Long-Leaved Groundcherry; Wild Tomatillo)

Photo of common ground cherry flower
Physalis longifolia
You’ve seen tomatillos in the grocery store, and you’ve probably enjoyed a delicious salsa verde at a Mexican restaurant. Common ground cherry is closely related to the tomatillo, and its fruits are edible, too. More

Common Ground Cherry (Plants With Fruits)

Photo of common ground cherry plants with fruits
You’ve seen tomatillos in the grocery store, and you’ve probably enjoyed a delicious salsa verde at a Mexican restaurant. Common ground cherry is closely related to the tomatillo, and its fruits are edible, too. More

Common Ground Cherry (Spent Flower With Immature Fruit)

Photo of common ground cherry spent flower with immature fruit
There are 13 Physalis species recorded for Missouri. All share the characteristic balloonlike, papery husk around the berry, which is why these plants are called “husk tomatoes.” More

Corn Salad

Photo of corn salad plants with flowers
At first glance, you might overlook corn salad, except for the large colonies it often forms. The young leaves can be eaten as a salad green, hence the name. More

Corn Salad

Photo of corn salad plants with flowers
Valerianella radiata
At first glance, you might overlook corn salad, except for the large colonies it often forms. The young leaves can be eaten as a salad green, hence the name. More

Dewberry

Photo of dewberry flowers
Rubus flagellaris
Dewberry is a lot like common blackberry, except that instead of being a small shrub, its canes form trailing woody vines. Both plants are prickly, and both produce delicious deep purple berries! More

Dewberry

Photo of dewberry flowers
Dewberry is a lot like common blackberry, except that instead of being a small shrub, its canes form trailing woody vines. Both plants are prickly, and both produce delicious deep purple berries! More