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Content tagged with "wild edible"

Photo of cleavers plants showing stalks with flower clusters

Cleavers (Bedstraw; Goose Grass)

Cleavers has narrow leaves that are in whorls of 6 to 8. They feel sticky due to small, coarse, recurving hairs. The stems are lightweight and 4-sided.

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Photo of cleavers flower cluster with developing fruits

Cleavers (Bedstraw; Goose Grass)

Cleavers has tiny, white, 4-petaled flowers that arise on stems from the leaf axils. The fruits are the tiny, round, “Velcro” covered balls that “stick tight” to your socks.

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Photo of cleavers plants showing stalks with flower clusters

Cleavers (Bedstraw; Goose Grass)

Cleavers is called “bedstraw” because early settlers used the dried, lightweight, pleasantly aromatic “straw” to fill bedding. When dried and roasted, the fruits have been used as a coffee substitute; it is said to be one of the better-tasting coffee substitutes from North America.

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Photo of cleavers, several plants in a colony

Cleavers (Bedstraw; Goose Grass)

Cleavers is a spreading, sprawling annual plant with 4-sided stems that are rarely upright. It occurs in moist or rich woods and thickets, wooded valleys, waste places, roadsides, and gardens—almost any shaded area.

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Color Plates

pdf (1.5 MB)
Downloadable color illustrations of every plant listed.

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Image of a blackberry flower

Common Blackberry

Rubus allegheniensis
“Please don’t throw me into the briar patch!” The real truth about blackberry bushes is that the prickles are worth braving—whether you’re a rabbit seeking shelter or a berry-picker hunting the delicious fruits.

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Photo of a dense stand of common cattail plants

Common Cattail (Broad-Leaved Cattail)

Common cattail, or broad-leaved cattail (Typha latifolia), like other cattails, spreads from thick, fleshy rhizomes and from the thousands of fluffy seeds released when the flower spike disintegrates. Because of their rapid growth and tendency to collect soil around their roots, cattails can fill in shallow ponds and other wet areas.

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Photo of common cattail colony

Common Cattail (Broad-Leaved Cattail)

Common cattail, or broad-leaved cattail (Typha latifolia), has flat leaves to 1 inch wide and usually reaches 8 feet high. The male and female flower sections are close together (the stalk isn’t visible above the brown sausagelike section and beneath the yellowish pollen-bearing section).

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Photo of common dayflower showing flowers and wet foliage.

Common Dayflower (Asiatic Dayflower)

Common dayflower is usually considered a weed, but a few people do cultivate it as an ornamental. In Asia, it is cooked and eaten as a green vegetable. In the 18th and 19th centuries, blue pigment from the flowers was used to color many of Japan’s famous woodblock prints.

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Photo of common dayflower flower and buds.

Common Dayflower (Asiatic Dayflower)

The flowers of common dayflower are truly blue, and they have only two conspicuous petals. A fast-growing, sprawling, but shallow-rooted weed, this introduced species commonly annoys gardeners.

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