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Content tagged with "wild edible"

Photo of a chicory plant.

Chicory (Blue Sailors)

Cichorium intybus
In summer and fall, the pretty blue flowers of chicory decorate roadsides and other disturbed areas. This weedy member of the aster family was introduced from Europe long ago. Its roots have been used as a coffee substitute.

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Photo of a chicory plant.

Chicory (Blue Sailors)

In summer and fall, the pretty blue flowers of chicory decorate roadsides and other disturbed areas. This weedy member of the aster family was introduced from Europe long ago. Its roots have been used as a coffee substitute.

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Photo of a chicory flower head and buds, grasped in a hand.

Chicory (Blue Sailors) (Flowerhead)

The flowerheads of chicory emerge all along the stems with light blue or white (occasionally pink), strap-shaped ray florets that are toothed at end. It blooms May-October.

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Photo of a chicory leaf with a hand for scale.

Chicory (Blue Sailors) (Leaves)

The basal leaves of chicory resemble those of dandelion, with a prominent center vein, triangular lobes, and deep, rounded sinuses. The leaves become much smaller above the base.

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Photo of cleavers plants showing stalks with flower clusters

Cleavers (Bedstraw; Goose Grass)

Cleavers is called “bedstraw” because early settlers used the dried, lightweight, pleasantly aromatic “straw” to fill bedding. When dried and roasted, the fruits have been used as a coffee substitute; it is said to be one of the better-tasting coffee substitutes from North America.

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Photo of cleavers, several plants in a colony

Cleavers (Bedstraw; Goose Grass)

Cleavers is a spreading, sprawling annual plant with 4-sided stems that are rarely upright. It occurs in moist or rich woods and thickets, wooded valleys, waste places, roadsides, and gardens—almost any shaded area.

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Photo of cleavers plants showing stalks with flower clusters

Cleavers (Bedstraw; Goose Grass)

Cleavers has narrow leaves that are in whorls of 6 to 8. They feel sticky due to small, coarse, recurving hairs. The stems are lightweight and 4-sided.

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Photo of cleavers flower cluster with developing fruits

Cleavers (Bedstraw; Goose Grass)

Cleavers has tiny, white, 4-petaled flowers that arise on stems from the leaf axils. The fruits are the tiny, round, “Velcro” covered balls that “stick tight” to your socks.

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Color Plates

pdf (1.5 MB)
Downloadable color illustrations of every plant listed.

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Image of a blackberry flower

Common Blackberry

Rubus allegheniensis
“Please don’t throw me into the briar patch!” The real truth about blackberry bushes is that the prickles are worth braving—whether you’re a rabbit seeking shelter or a berry-picker hunting the delicious fruits.

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