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Content tagged with "wild edible"

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A listing of additional information sources about wild edibles.

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Illustration of black haw leaves, flowers, fruit.

Black Haw

Black haw, Viburnum prunifolium.

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Illustration of black haw leaves, flowers, fruit.

Black Haw

Viburnum prunifolium
Black haw is a small understory tree with beautiful fall color — deep lavender or maroon-purple, finally becoming deep rose-red. Its clusters of blue-black berries, borne on red stalks, happen to be quite tasty. No wonder it has been cultivated as an ornamental since 1727!

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Illustration of black hickory compound leaf and fruit.

Black Hickory

Carya texana
Black hickory is also called the Ozark pignut hickory. Its nut, like that of the pignut hickory (Carya glabra), is awfully hard to crack. Because rural Ozarkers noticed their hogs had no trouble extracting the sweet kernels, both species came to be called "pignut hickories."

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Photo of black mustard flower cluster

Black Mustard

Brassica nigra
Next time you breeze past weedy black mustard on the highway or spot it in a fallow field, think of how important this and other mustards are to the world economy – and to your dinner table.

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Illustration of black walnut compound leaf and nuts.

Black Walnut

Black walnut, Juglans nigra.

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Image of a black walnut leaf

Black Walnut

Juglans nigra
Easily Missouri’s most valuable tree, the black walnut provides the finest wood in the world, as well as delicious nuts. Both are in high demand and thus form an important part of Missouri’s economy.

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Usage listing for blue-flowering edibles Spiderwort - Chicory.

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Usage listing for brown- and red-flowering edibles Maple-Thistle.  

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Usage listing for brown- and red-flowering edibles, Wake Robin - Crab Apples.

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