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Content tagged with "weed"

Photo of Johnson grass flower clusters

Johnson Grass

Sorghum halepense
Johnson grass is a native of the Mediterranean that is invasive in our country. It’s a weed that infests cropland and degrades native ecosystems, and heavy infestations are found in all the major river bottoms of Missouri.

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Photo of Johnson grass, big clump next to a field

Johnson Grass

Johnson grass is a tall, coarse, perennial grass with stout rhizomes. It grows in dense clumps or nearly solid stands in crop fields, pastures, abandoned fields, rights-of-way, and forest edges and along stream banks.

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Photo of Johnson grass flower clusters

Johnson Grass (Flower Clusters)

The flower clusters (panicles) of Johnson grass are large, loosely branched, purplish, and hairy. The spikelets (the small flowering units) occur in pairs or threes, and each has a conspicuous awn. It blooms June through November.

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Photo of Johnson grass infesting a crop field

Johnson Grass Infesting A Crop Field

Johnson grass is a native of the Mediterranean that is invasive in our country. It’s a weed that infests cropland and degrades native ecosystems, and heavy infestations are found in all the major river bottoms of Missouri.

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Photo of leafy spurge seed heads

Leafy Spurge

Euphorbia esula
When you consider the negative effects this plant has on natural habitats, and how hard it is to control or eradicate, you almost want to rename it “leafy scourge”! This invasive plant is spreading in our state. Learn how to identify it.

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Photo of leafy spurge seed heads

Leafy Spurge (Seed Heads)

Leafy spurge is an invasive plant that is spreading in our state. Leaves are usually alternate, but those immediately beneath the flowers are whorled. Leaves on the lower half of the stem are scalelike, while those on the upper parts are linear to oblong. All parts of the plant bleed a milky sap that causes skin irritation. Flowers are borne in umbels and appear greenish yellow.

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Photo of several reed canary grass plants with flowering heads

Reed Canary Grass

Phalaris arundinacea
Reed canary grass is native to Europe, Asia, and North America, and it varies quite a bit. Our native Missouri version, for instance, is quite different from the Eurasian type that has been widely introduced—and which has proven to be highly invasive.

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Photo of several reed canary grass plants with flowering heads

Reed Canary Grass

Reed canary grass is native to Europe, Asia, and North America, and it varies quite a bit. Our native Missouri version, for instance, is quite different from the Eurasian type that has been widely introduced—and which has proven to be highly invasive.

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Photo of rough-fruited cinquefoil plant and flowers

Rough-Fruited Cinquefoil (Sulphur Cinquefoil)

Rough-fruited cinquefoil is common in most of North America in fields and pastures, along roadsides, and other disturbed areas. It’s a stout, tall, hairy plant with five yellow to cream-colored, slightly notched petals.

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Photo of rough-fruited cinquefoil flowers

Rough-Fruited Cinquefoil (Sulphur Cinquefoil)

Rough-fruited cinquefoil flowers have 5 slightly notched petals that are longer than the calyx lobes and light yellow to cream-colored. It blooms May-August.

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