Content tagged with "weed"

Cut-Leaved Teasel (Leaves)

Photo of cut-leaved teasel showing deeply pinnately lobed leaves.
The deeply cut, pinnately lobed stem leaves explain the name of cut-leaved teasel. More

Garlic Mustard

Photo of garlic mustard plant with flowers
Alliaria petiolata
Because each plant disperses a large number of seeds, garlic mustard can outcompete native vegetation for light, moisture, nutrients, soil, and space as it quickly colonizes an area. More

Garlic Mustard

Photo of garlic mustard plant with flowers
Because each plant disperses a large number of seeds, garlic mustard can out compete native vegetation for light, moisture, nutrients, soil, and space as it quickly colonizes an area. More

Garlic Mustard (Flowers)

Photo of garlic mustard plant showing flowers
Garlic mustard, an invasive plant, blooms May through June. The flowers are numerous, small, white, 1/4 inch across, and are borne in a terminal raceme at the apex of the stem and also at some leaf axils. Each flower has 4 white petals that narrow abruptly at the base. More

Japanese Knotweed

Photo of Japanese knotweed
One of the worst invasive species in the world, Japanese knotweed can thrive in many places and can even damage foundations of buildings—not to mention the harm it causes in natural habitats. Learn to identify it so you can prevent its spread. More

Japanese Knotweed

Photo of Japanese knotweed
Fallopia japonica
One of the worst invasive species in the world, this plant can thrive in many places and can even damage foundations of buildings—not to mention the harm it causes in natural habitats. Learn to “know thine enemy,” so you can prevent its spread. More

Japanese Stiltgrass

Photo of Japanese stiltgrass
Japanese stiltgrass in an invasive annual grass with thin, pale green, lance-shaped leaves that are 3 inches long. The midvein of the leaf is off-center and has a distinct silvery stripe of reflective hairs. Each plant produces hundreds of small, yellow-to-red seeds that can remain viable for five years. More

Japanese Stiltgrass

Photo of Japanese stiltgrass
Japanese stiltgrass is invasive and has spread to nearly every eastern U.S. state. It forms dense patches, displacing and outcompeting native species for nutrients and light. In some cases, stiltgrass has been known to completely replace ground vegetation in three to five years. More

Japanese Stiltgrass (Eulalia)

Photo of Japanese stiltgrass
Microstegium vimineum
Japanese stiltgrass is an invasive annual grass with thin, pale green, lance-shaped leaves that are 3 inches long. It has spread to nearly every eastern U.S. state. It forms dense patches, displacing and outcompeting native species for nutrients and light. More

Johnson Grass

Photo of Johnson grass panicles against a blue sky
Johnson grass is native to the Mediterranean and now occurs in warm-temperate regions worldwide. It is common in the southern United States. Heavy infestations in river bottoms can reduce corn or soybean yields in Missouri to a few bushels per acre. More than 300,000 acres are infested in the Missouri Bootheel alone. More