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Content tagged with "weed"

Photo of a cornflower, closeup of a flowerhead.

Cornflower (Bachelor’s Button) (Flowerhead)

A member of the thistle tribe of composites, cornflower lacks true ray florets; instead, the outer florets of each head have enlarged, flaring corolla tubes that at a glance look something like the strap-shaped extensions of true ray florets.

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Photo of a cornflower, closeup of a flowerhead.

Cornflower (Bachelor’s Button; Blue Bottle)

Centaurea cyanus
A native of Europe, cornflower is a popular garden flower that often escapes to nearby areas. It’s used in bridal bouquets and men’s boutonnieres. Its intense blue color appears in boxes of crayons!

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Photo of a cluster of blooming cornflower plants.

Cornflower (Bachelor’s Button; Blue Bottle)

A native of Europe, cornflower is a popular garden flower that often escapes to nearby areas. It’s used in bridal bouquets and men’s boutonnieres. Its intense blue color appears in boxes of crayons!

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Photo of crown vetch plants with flowers

Crown Vetch

When you drive through Missouri in the summer, you’re almost guaranteed to see the pink flower clusters of crown vetch, whose masses of green foliage coat the right-of-ways along highways. This weedy plant stabilizes the dirt after road construction but degrades our natural ecosystems.

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Photo of crown vetch showing flowers and leaves.

Crown Vetch

Crown vetch prefers open, sunny areas. It occurs along roadsides and other rights-of-way, in open fields, and on gravel bars along streams. It is found most easily when it is blooming, when its profuse pinkish blossoms are conspicuous.

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Photo of crown vetch, closeup of a flower cluster.

Crown Vetch

Securigera varia (formerly Coronilla varia)
When you drive through Missouri in the summer, you’re almost guaranteed to see the pink flower clusters of crown vetch, whose masses of green foliage coat the right-of-ways along highways. This weedy plant stabilizes the dirt after road construction but degrades our natural ecosystems.

Read more

Photo of crown vetch, closeup of a flower cluster.

Crown Vetch (Flowers)

Crown vetch blooms May through August. Its flowers are pinkish to white and are in crown-shaped clusters. Each individual flower is shaped like a typical pea flower.

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Photo of cut-leaved teasel plants showing white flowering heads.

Cut-Leaved Teasel

Currently, invasive teasels in our state occur mainly along highways, but these aggressive weeds can outcompete native plants, especially in prairies and savannas. Their spines protect them from being eaten by most herbivores, so it’s up to humans to check their spread.

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Photo of cut-leaved teasel showing flowerhead and joined, cuplike leaves.

Cut-Leaved Teasel

Cut-leaved teasel is more aggressive than common teasel. Note its flowerheads with white flowers, and the cuplike structure created by the opposite leaves as they fuse around the stem.

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Photo of cut-leaved teasel, blooming flowerhead, showing white flowers.

Cut-Leaved Teasel (Flowerheads)

Cut-leaved teasel typically has white flowers. It was first recorded in our state in 1968, when it apparently had sprouted from seeds spread from a cemetery wreath to a nearby fencerow. But there have undoubtedly been numerous introductions since then. It is robust, aggressive, and is spreading rapidly along highways and other open habitats.

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