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Content tagged with "waterfowl"

Photo of a male canvasback floating on the water.

Canvasback Male

The adult male canvasback has a chestnut head, a notably long, sloping, blackish bill, a black chest and under tail coverts, and a white body. Like other bay ducks (also called diving ducks or pochards), canvasback typically dive completely underwater.

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Photo of five canvasbacks floating on a lake, apparently asleep.

Canvasbacks

Canvasback are usually seen on lakes, rivers, and marshes. In Missouri, they are most common along the Mississippi River. Compared to other diving ducks in this genus, canvasback are more frequently found in deeper water. They are often observed in fall and winter in large “rafts” or groups on open water.

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Learn about the relationship between waterfowl and waterfowl refuges.

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Cato Structure

pdf (59.8 K)
The Cato Structure coffer dam at Duck Creek CA.

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Cato Structure II

pdf (77.4 K)
Details of the renovation of the Cato Structure.

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Cato Structure III

pdf (256.8 K)
Aerial view of the Cato structure.

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The Cato Water Control Structure.

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Photo of a female common merganser, closeup on head and front.

Common Merganser

Like our other mergansers, the common merganser has a long, slender, serrated bill and dives underwater for fish. This species, however, has only a short head crest and has unique color patterns.

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Photo of a male common merganser floating on water.

Common Merganser

Mergus merganser
Like our other mergansers, the common merganser has a long, slender, serrated bill and dives underwater for fish. This species, however, has only a short head crest and has unique color patterns.

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Photo of a male common merganser floating on water, eating a fish.

Common Merganser Eating Fish

Common mergansers forage on rivers and lakes for fish, frogs, and aquatic invertebrates. They hunt by sight and dive completely underwater to snag their prey. The serrated bill helps them grab slippery fish. Their diet of fish makes their flesh taste “rank and strong,” so duck hunters rarely shoot mergansers.

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