Content tagged with "violet"

Bird's-Foot Violet (Lavender Form)

Photo of bird's-foot violet, lavender form
Bird’s-foot violet, named for its deeply lobed leaves, has two color phases: either all 5 petals are pale lilac or lavender, as pictured here, or the upper 2 petals are deep, velvety purple with the 3 lower petals pale lilac to lavender. The center of the united stamens is always deep orange. This wildflower blooms April-June. More

Bird’s-Foot Violet

Photo of bird's-foot violet (bicolored form)
Viola pedata
Also called "pansy violet" and "hens and roosters," this spring wildflower can make a glade or bluff top heavenly with its pretty lavender and purple "faces." When you see your first big colony of bird's-foot violets, you will probably never forget it. More

Bird’s-Foot Violet (Purple and Lavender Form)

Photo of bird's-foot violet (bicolored form)
One of the color variations of bird’s-foot violet has 2 deep purple petals on top, and 3 lavender petals below. Also called “pansy violet” and “hens and roosters,” this spring wildflower can make a glade or bluff top heavenly with its pretty lavender and purple “faces.” When you see your first big colony of bird’s-foot violets, you will probably never forget it. More

Common Violet

Photo of common violet
The common violet occurs in rocky or dry open woods, thickets, borders of woods, mostly on hillsides, but also near streams and ponds, in ditches, and in other wet places. It is also found in yards and along roadsides and railroads. It is often cultivated. More

Common Violet

Photo of common violet plant with flowers
There are nearly 20 species of violets in Missouri. The common violet, which can be violet, white, or white-and-violet, is found statewide in a variety of habitats. Note its heart-shaped or rounded, scalloped leaves, and (usually) the presence of hairs on stems and/or foliage. More

Common Violet

Photo of common violet
Viola sororia
There are nearly 20 species of violets in Missouri. This one, which can be violet, white, or white-and-violet, is found statewide in a variety of habitats. Note its heart-shaped or rounded, scalloped leaves, and (usually) the presence of hairs on stems and/or foliage. More

Common Violet ("Confederate Violet" Form)

Photo of common violet, Confederate violet form.
The color of Viola sororia is variable. Although some forms are solid violet, others have grayish-white petals with violet or blue veins and more solid patches of these colors on the inner portion of the petals, forming a broad, U-shaped eyespot. These are often called “Confederate violets.” More

Johnny-Jump-Up

Image of Johnny-jump-up.
Johnny-jump-up, also called field pansy. More

Johnny-Jump-Up (Field Pansy)

Image of Johnny-jump-up.
Viola bicolor
It's not our largest violet, but it's one of the most common. The coloration of these delicate-looking flowers often looks faded. Look for it in fields, meadows, glades, rights-of-way, disturbed sites and possibly your front lawn. More

Yellow Violet

Photo of yellow violet plant with flower
It sounds like a contradiction in terms, but seeing is believing! Yellow violets, which are less common than violet violets, seem like a special treat when you find them in the low woods, rich slopes, and wooded floodplains they inhabit. More