Content tagged with "vine"

Sand Vine (Climbing Milkweed; Blue Vine)

Photo of sand vine covering a bush.
Sand vine is a perennial, vigorous, aggressive climbing vine with stems that can reach lengths of 33 feet, covering fences and shrubs. More

Sand Vine (Climbing Milkweed; Blue Vine)

Photo of sand vine flowers.
The flowers of sand vine form in open groups arising on stalks from the leaf axils. The flowers are white, tiny, and strongly scented; the corolla lobes stand upright around a fleshy corona. It blooms July–September. More

Sand Vine (Climbing Milkweed; Blue Vine; Honey Vine)

Photo of sand vine, leaves with flower cluster.
Cynanchum laeve
Beloved by bees, butterflies, and other insects for its nectar, sand vine is a problem weed that can be difficult to eradicate. Some people cultivate it as an ornamental, and beekeepers value it as an excellent honey plant. More

Sand Vine Climbing Milkweed; Blue Vine)

Photo of sand vine flower cluster.
Sand vine is a native milkweed vine that provides needed nectar for monarch butterflies as they migrate southward in late summer. Monarchs also lay their eggs on the plant, and their larvae feed on the foliage. More

Wild Potato Vine (Man-of-the-Earth)

Photo of wild potato vine flowers and leaves
Wild potato vine is a native vine that is related to the cultivated sweet potato we buy at grocery stores. It is also related to the morning glories that decorate trellises, and to the bindweed that plagues gardeners and farmers. More

Wild Potato Vine (Man-of-the-Earth)

Photo of wild potato vine flowers and leaves
Ipomoea pandurata
This native vine is related to the cultivated sweet potato we buy at grocery stores. Wild potato vine is also related to the morning glories that decorate trellises, and to the bindweed that plagues gardeners and farmers. More

Wintercreeper

Euonymus fortunei
Introduced from Asia as a groundcover, wintercreeper has escaped cultivation in all the eastern states. It’s frequently found near urban centers, with heavy infestations in woodlands around St. Louis and Kansas City. More

Yellow Passion Flower

Photo of yellow passionflower showing leaves, buds, flowers, and immature fruit.
Yellow passion flower is an herbaceous perennial vine, climbing by tendrils. The leaves are alternate, shallowly three-lobed, and about 4 inches long and 6 inches wide. Based on their tendrils and fruit structure, passion flowers were long thought to be related to the cucumber family. Genetic evidence is showing they are more closely related to violets and willows. More

Yellow Passion Flower

Photo of yellow passionflower showing leaves, tendrils, flowers, buds, and more.
In Missouri, yellow passion flower is scattered mostly south of the Missouri River. It blooms May–August. Look for it in bottomland forests, rich upland forests, bases and ledges of bluffs, margins of glades, and banks of streams and rivers. More

Yellow Passion Flower (Flowers)

Photo of yellow passionflower flowers.
The yellowish-green flowers of yellow passion flower grow in groups of 1 to 3 and are about 1 inch across, each on a stalk to 1½ inches long. The flowers are intricate, with numerous fringed floral parts. More