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Content tagged with "vine"

Photo of crown vetch, closeup of a flower cluster.

Crown Vetch

Securigera varia (formerly Coronilla varia)
When you drive through Missouri in the summer, you’re almost guaranteed to see the pink flower clusters of crown vetch, whose masses of green foliage coat the right-of-ways along highways. This weedy plant stabilizes the dirt after road construction but degrades our natural ecosystems.

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Photo of crown vetch, closeup of a flower cluster.

Crown Vetch (Flowers)

Crown vetch blooms May through August. Its flowers are pinkish to white and are in crown-shaped clusters. Each individual flower is shaped like a typical pea flower.

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Grape Honeysuckle

Lonicera reticulata (formerly L. prolifera)
One of Missouri's beautiful native honeysuckles, grape honeysuckle is found mainly in the northern two-thirds of the state. In the native plant garden, it is easy to grow, but it is not aggressive like the introduced invasive Japanese honeysuckle.

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Photo of hedge bindweed flowers

Hedge Bindweed

Calystegia sepium (also Convolvulus sepium)
Instantly recognizable as a type of morning glory, hedge bindweed is common in disturbed habitats and can be a serious agricultural weed, but it is not as problematic as its relative field bindweed.

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Photo of a huge mass of kudzu vines covering trees and ground

Kudzu

Of the many invasive exotic plants that were originally introduced to stop soil erosion and improve soils, kudzu is one of the worst. This “vine that ate the South” is often the first plant that comes to mind when we think of “invasive exotics.”

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Photo of a huge mass of kudzu vines covering trees and ground

Kudzu

Pueraria montana
Of the many invasive exotic plants that were originally introduced to stop soil erosion and improve soils, kudzu is one of the worst. This “vine that ate the South” is often the first plant that comes to mind when we think of “invasive exotics.”

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Photo of blooming passionflower

Passion Flower (Passionflower; Maypops)

Passiflora incarnata
The bizarre, complicated flowers attract attention! The fruits are edible. Passion flower is a nonwoody vine that climbs via tendrils on trees or other structures. It is native to the southeastern United States, including southern Missouri.

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Photo of blooming passionflower

Passion Flower (Passionflower; Maypops)

The bizarre, complicated flowers attract attention—and butterflies! The fruits are edible. Passion flower is a nonwoody vine that climbs via tendrils on trees or other structures. It is native to the southeastern United States, including southern Missouri.

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Image of poison ivy

Poison Ivy

Toxicodendron radicans
This toxic plant contains an oil in all its parts that, if you come into contact with it, can cause an intense skin reaction. This is no reason to stay indoors, however! Learn to recognize poison ivy, and sidestep it on your outings.

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Photo of sand vine, leaves with flower cluster.

Sand Vine (Climbing Milkweed; Blue Vine)

Beloved by bees, butterflies, and other insects for its nectar, sand vine is a problem weed of crop fields and gardens, where it can be difficult to eradicate. Some people cultivate it as an ornamental, and beekeepers value it as an excellent honey plant.

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