Content tagged with "vine"

Chinese Yam

Photo of Chinese yam showing leaves and bulbils
Dioscorea oppositifolia (sometimes called D. batatas)
Similar to kudzu, Chinese yam is an aggressive vine that overtakes nearly everything within reach that stands still long enough! Learn more about this invasive plant—and please don’t plant it! More

Chinese Yam (Bulbils and Leaves)

Photo of Chinese yam showing leaves and bulbils
New vines quickly sprout from the bulbils of Chinese yam. These drop off the vine and are carried to new locations by water or rodents or in topsoil moved for construction purposes. Even a small piece of a bulbil will sprout into a new vine, the way a small piece of a potato can create a new plant. The bulbils can overwinter and form new vines in spring. More

Chinese Yam (Bulbils)

Photo of Chinese yam vine showing bulbils
Although Chinese yam is not known to produce seed in the United States, it produces bulbils, which resemble tiny Irish potatoes and are not technically fruits, in the leaf axils. More

Chinese Yam (Leaves)

Photo of a pair of Chinese yam leaves
The leaves of Chinese yam are usually opposite (sometimes alternate toward branch tips), green, with 7-9 parallel veins, fiddle-shaped or heart-shaped, with pointed tip and two lobes near the base of the leaf. More

Chinese Yam (New Growth)

Photo of Chinese yam plant showing young foliage
The new growth of Chinese yam often has a reddish coloration at the base of the leaves. More

Chinese Yam Infestation

Photo of large mound of Chinese yam vines
Similar to kudzu, Chinese yam is an aggressive vine that overtakes nearly everything within reach that stands still long enough! Learn more about this invasive plant—and please don’t plant it! More

Climbing Milkweed

Photo of climbing milkweed flowers and leaves.
The brown, starlike, spreading flowers of climbing milkweed differ from those of other milkweeds. The leaves are opposite, broadly ovate and heart-shaped, to 6 inches long. The fruit is a narrow pod, to 4 inches long, covered with slender, warty projections. More

Climbing Milkweed

Photo of climbing milkweed flowers and leaves.
Matelea decipiens
The brown, starlike, spreading flowers of climbing milkweed differ from those of other milkweeds, but milky sap, warty pods with silk-tasseled seeds, and the structures in the center of the flowers show its true alliance. More

Crown Vetch

Photo of crown vetch, closeup of a flower cluster.
Securigera varia (formerly Coronilla varia)
When you drive through Missouri in the summer, you’re almost guaranteed to see the pink flower clusters of crown vetch, whose masses of green foliage coat the right-of-ways along highways. This weedy plant stabilizes the dirt after road construction but degrades our natural ecosystems. More

Crown Vetch

Photo of crown vetch plants with flowers
When you drive through Missouri in the summer, you’re almost guaranteed to see the pink flower clusters of crown vetch, whose masses of green foliage coat the right-of-ways along highways. This weedy plant stabilizes the dirt after road construction but degrades our natural ecosystems. More