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Content tagged with "urban tree"

Tree Planting in Joplin

After the Storm: A Joplin Update

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The community welcomes one of the largest urban reforestation efforts in Missouri history as a sign of rebirth.

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Use this publication to learn how to identify and control the Callery pear, also known as Bradford pear.

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Canadian Hemlock

Tsuga canadensis
Also called eastern hemlock, this tree is encountered only in landscaping in our state. But based on one instance in Oregon County, we know it can reproduce and spread here on its own. So if you find it on a hike, it was almost certainly planted there at some point. Look around for a cistern, old home foundation and other persisting garden plants nearby.

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Care of Newly Planted Trees

Practice these simple maintenance tips to ensure well-established, healthy Missouri trees.

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European Alder (Black Alder)

Alnus glutinosa
Native to Europe and Asia, this tree is planted widely as an ornamental. In some parts of the United States and elsewhere in the world, this species becomes weedy, even invasive. In Missouri, you are most likely to encounter it in landscaped areas, and not in the wild.

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Drought and other stresses work together to cause Missouri's urban trees to lose health and vigor over time. Learn to identify, respond to, and prevent urban tree decline.

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golden rain tree

Golden Rain Tree

Koelreuteria paniculata
This native of China and Korea was cultivated in Missouri for years, often in urban landscaping. Because it readily escapes from cultivation and is invasive, it is no longer recommended for planting in Missouri.

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Grant Helps Missouri Community Trees

With all the storms and damage to trees in the past two years, many Missouri towns and cities face unusually big challenges when it comes to keeping their trees alive and thriving.

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Use this report report to learn more about the attitudes of local officials toward urban forestry in Missouri communities.

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This full-color, 60-page booklet in helps you choose the best trees for your growing situations, plant them in the right places and care for them over time. It includes lists of species for Missouri, including alternatives to ash trees, which are vulnerable to the emerald ash borer.

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