Content tagged with "true bug"

Aphids

image of Aphids on plant
Aphids are soft-bodied, plump, pear-shaped, and tiny. They suck plant juices. They have two tubelike projections on the hind end of the body, called cornicles, which aid in defense. Aphids are commonly green, yellow, or brown, but the color varies among the many, many species. More

Aphids

image of Aphids on plant
More than 1,300 species in North America north of Mexico
Aphids are common, small, soft-bodied insects that suck plant juices. To see them well, you probably need a hand lens, but the damage they do to plants can be all too obvious! More

Assassin Bug

image of Assassin Bug crawling on a leaf
Although many species of assassin bugs are black or brown, some are more brightly colored. They have an elongated head bearing a single, clawlike tube used for piercing and injecting venom into their prey. More

Assassin Bugs

image of Assassin Bug crawling on a leaf
Nearly 200 species in North America north of Mexico
Assassin bugs are usually black or brown, with an elongated head bearing a single, clawlike tube used for piercing and injecting venom into their prey. They are common in Missouri. More

Boxelder Bug

image of a boxelder bug
Boisea trivittatus
Notoriously numerous, these harmless bugs like to spend the winter in nooks of tree bark and rocks, but they will settle for warm crannies of your house as well. Their food plant is the box elder tree, hence the common name. More

Boxelder Bug

Image of boxelder bug.
In autumn you may see hundreds of boxelder bugs crawling on the south-facing side of your house, seeking winter shelter. They go dormant as the weather gets colder, but if they are warmed by your home’s heating, they may revive and enter your house, mistaking its warmth for springtime. More

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug Eggs and Nymphs

Photo of eggs and nymphs of brown marmorated stink bug
The brown marmorated stink bug (Halyomorpha halys), a native of southeast Asia, was discovered in Pennsylvania in 1998, apparently having hitched a ride on shipping crates. A pest of fruit trees, soybeans, and many other crops, it is spreading across North America. It has been found in Missouri. These are the eggs and newly hatched nymphs. More

Giant Water Bug (Belostoma)

Photo of a giant water bug
Members of the genus Belostoma can reach 2 inches in length. Strong fliers, they are also called "electric light bugs" because at night they are attracted to artificial lights. More

Giant Water Bug Beak

Photo showing the beak of a giant water bug
Like all other "true bugs," giant water bugs have tubelike, piercing mouthparts. In this case, they inject a saliva that paralyzes and digests their prey. The bug sucks the resulting liquid. More

Giant Water Bug Nymph

Photo of a giant water bug nymph
Giant water bugs develop full wings for flying upon their final molt. Until then, "wing buds" appear on the sides of the thorax of immature bugs. Most true bugs have wings that develop this way. More