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Content tagged with "trefoil"

Photo of bird’s-foot trefoil plant with flowers

Bird’s-Foot Trefoil

Bird’s-foot trefoil produces its bright golden yellow flowers from May to September. A native of Europe, it has a worldwide distribution. It is used as a low-growing groundcover, soil stabilizer, and forage and cover crop.

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Photo of bird's-foot trefoil, closeup of flower cluster.

Bird’s-Foot Trefoil

The flowers of bird's-foot trefoil grow in umbels, at the tips of the stalks, and have the typical configuration of pea flowers. This plant blooms May–September.

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Photo of bird's-foot trefoil, closeup of flower cluster.

Bird’s-Foot Trefoil

Lotus corniculatus
Bird’s-foot trefoil forms low patches of bright yellow flowers along roadsides, having been planted to stabilize soil after road construction. Up close, it clearly has pea flowers. The leaves are cloverlike, with two leafy stipules at the base of each.

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Photo of bird’s-foot trefoil plant with flowers

Bird’s-Foot Trefoil

Bird’s-foot trefoil forms low patches of bright yellow flowers along roadsides, having been planted to stabilize soil after road construction. Up close, it clearly has pea flowers. The leaves are trifoliate, with two leafy stipules at the base of each.

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Photo of tick trefoil plant with flowers

Tick Trefoil (Beggar’s Lice; Beggar’s Ticks)

Desmodium spp. (20 species in Missouri)
Neither “tick trefoil” nor “beggar’s lice” is a noble-sounding name! But considering how the chains of hairy little seedpods stick to your clothing, likening these “sticktights” to parasites seems completely natural!

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