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Content tagged with "tree"

Dwarf Chestnut Oak

Quercus prinoides
Although only 3–10 feet tall, and the shortest of Missouri's oaks, this shrub or small tree can nevertheless produce abundant acorns that are relished by several types of birds and mammals.

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eastern redcedar tree

Eastern Red Cedar

Juniperus virginiana
By far the most common native conifer in the state, eastern red cedar is useful for its aromatic, red wood and beloved for its greenery, its resinous blue “berries” and the spicy odor it lends the out-of-doors.

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Photo of an eastern redbud tree growing at woodland border

Eastern Redbud

Redbud grows statewide, in open woodland, borders of woods, dolomite glades, and along rocky streams and bluffs; also found in landscape plantings. In the wild, it is generally an understory tree.

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Photo of an eastern redbud tree in bloom

Eastern Redbud

Eastern redbud is a favorite small, spring-flowering landscaping tree. In fall the leaves turn yellow or greenish yellow. Many people find the pods attractive as well.

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Photo of eastern redbud blossoms

Eastern Redbud

Eastern redbud is a native shrub or small tree that is distinctly ornamental in spring with small, clustered, rose-purple flowers covering the bare branches before the leaves.

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Photo of eastern redbud blossoms

Eastern Redbud

Cercis canadensis
Eastern redbud is a native shrub or small tree that is distinctly ornamental in spring with small, clustered, rose-purple flowers covering the bare branches before the leaves.

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Photo of an eastern redbud tree branch covered in rose-purple blossoms

Eastern Redbud (Flowers)

In spring, redbud’s clusters of small, rose-purple flowers cover the bare branches. It blooms in late March to early May. Note that the petals of the flowers are in the typical pea-family configuration. The flowers are edible and can be eaten in salads, either raw or pickled; in Mexico, they are fried.

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eastern white pine

Eastern White Pine

Pinus strobus
It is unlikely you will find an eastern white pine on a hike, unless you come across an old homesite where somebody planted it, or the trees that were its parents. A native to much of eastern North America, it has been widely introduced in Missouri and sometimes reproduces on its own.

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Enduring Red Cedar

Since buying our little house in the woods 13 years ago, I have cut down hundreds of cedar trees for various reasons.

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European Alder (Black Alder)

Alnus glutinosa
Native to Europe and Asia, this tree is planted widely as an ornamental. In some parts of the United States and elsewhere in the world, this species becomes weedy, even invasive. In Missouri, you are most likely to encounter it in landscaped areas, and not in the wild.

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