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Content tagged with "tree"

Callery Pear

Callery Pear (Bradford Pear)

Pyrus calleryana
Sometimes a specific variety of a tree becomes so popular that the whole species becomes known by that name. This is the case with the widely planted 'Bradford' callery pear. Although callery pear has been hugely popular in landscaping, it can escape and hybridize with relatives. Alarmingly, it has become an invasive plant. Learn more about this problem, so you can choose your landscaping trees wisely!

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Canadian Hemlock

Tsuga canadensis
Also called eastern hemlock, this tree is encountered only in landscaping in our state. But based on one instance in Oregon County, we know it can reproduce and spread here on its own. So if you find it on a hike, it was almost certainly planted there at some point. Look around for a cistern, old home foundation and other persisting garden plants nearby.

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Champion Burr Oak Tree near McBaine, Mo.

Champion Burr Oak Tree

The Missouri state champion burr oak tree stands in a field near McBaine.

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Champion Trees in Missouri

I think it’s hard not to feel both humbled and uplifted when you’re standing near a very big, very old tree.

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Image of a cherrybark oak leaf

Cherrybark Oak

Quercus pagoda
The bark of this tree, as the name suggests, looks like the bark of a cherry tree. The species name starts to make sense when you hold one of the leaves with the leaf stalk upward: The pointed lobes make the leaf resemble an outline of a Chinese pagoda. Look for it in Missouri's Bootheel counties.

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Chinkapin Oak

Chinkapin Oak

Quercus muehlenbergii
This attractive tree is fairly easy to identify because of its distinctively toothed leaves. It has edible acorns and valuable wood. Look for it growing in rocky soils derived from limestone or dolomite on bluffs and in upland woods. It is also found in floodplain forests and lower slopes along streams.

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Christmas Tree - When the Weather is Frightful

It’s time to get out and find just the right tree for the holidays.

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Coming Soon to a Landscape Near You

You may have noticed some flowering trees already this spring: the white blooms of serviceberry, plums and ornamental pears and the pink of Japanese magnolia and peaches.

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Common Alder

Alnus serrulata
Alder is a good plant to know—its flowers and fruits are eaten by wildlife, its thick roots prevent erosion while enriching the soil, its bark has a long history of medical uses and the dried female catkins, which look like tiny pinecones, are useful in craft projects and in jewelry!

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Communities of Trees

This content is archived
Branch Out Missouri helps keep our cities green.

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